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  #21  
Old 11-22-2020, 07:04 PM
rob30-06 rob30-06 is online now
 
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Location: Tennessee
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Default Just one more data point

This is a photo of my Collector Grade SA 5.79. It still has powder on it so maybe not the best example of color, but thought I would add it to the discussion.

[IMG][/IMG]

Rob

Last edited by rob30-06; 11-22-2020 at 07:17 PM.
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  #22  
Old 11-22-2020, 07:47 PM
Tennboy Tennboy is offline
 
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Location: East Tennessee
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Thanks Rob, your post and pic definitely add to the conversation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rob30-06 View Post
This is a photo of my Collector Grade SA 5.79. It still has powder on it so maybe not the best example of color, but thought I would add it to the discussion.

[IMG][/IMG]

Rob
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  #23  
Old 11-22-2020, 10:17 PM
Rock Rock is offline
 
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Beautiful wood; beautiful rifle; what damage?...geesh.
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  #24  
Old 11-22-2020, 11:08 PM
Ronwall Ronwall is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lapriester View Post
That's not unusual at all and I've seen color differences much more pronounced than that I assure you. I've even seen some that were even lighter on just one side of the stock than the other side. Lots lighter. Lighter means more center cut from the block of wood. More center cut also means harder and closer grained making it harder for the oil to penetrate.
I have a SA DAS stock that has a sap line running almost the entire length of the stock. The difference between where the sap line is and the other parts is striking. If not for the walnut grain pattern and color in the barrel channel and the forearm section it could easily be mistaken for a birch stock.
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  #25  
Old 11-30-2020, 08:50 AM
TSimonetti TSimonetti is offline
 
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A lot of these premium rifles and stocks were caked with grease and grime even though pristine underneath. Perhaps the owner wiped it down with acetone or some other cleaner that did not degrade the stampings but did wipe off some of the finish?

Many collectors also shoot these and display them so to make it look more like it did as it left the factory and shootable is more important than original aged arsenal finish and caked grease on the wood. I don't see major sanding. The rifle and/or stock has perhaps lost value with high end collectors, but on the other hand, might actually be a more attractive buy for many who want something original/correct that is in display or shooter condition rather than something that needs to stay locked in a time capsule with it's VCR paper intact in order to keep all it's value.

Different strokes for different folks. The stock set is correct color and gorgeous and looks very much like it left the factory albeit not exactly. This thread is largely an argument in search of a controversy in my opinion simply because the rifle itself is a restoration not an original gun, so refinished or not, it's a really nice job and represents well.

Last edited by TSimonetti; 11-30-2020 at 08:55 AM.
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  #26  
Old 11-30-2020, 09:22 AM
Tennboy Tennboy is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TSimonetti View Post
The stock set is correct color and gorgeous and looks very much like it left the factory albeit not exactly. This thread is largely an argument in search of a controversy in my opinion simply because the rifle itself is a restoration not an original gun, so refinished or not, it's a really nice job and represents well.
I did not post this thread in search of a controversy, just seeking opinions, but I get your drift. It is obvious to me after reading comments above that at a minimum oils were applied to the wood during maintenance after initial issuance. The metal finish is taking on a slight greenish hue as well, also likely due to application of oils and routine handling. It is indeed a restoration, not original, though I recall seeing Correct Grades at the South Store nine-ten years ago in inferior condition, with heavily sanded stocks, scarred stocks, Greek-applied rack/unit/serial numbers stamped on the right butt, and approximately 90% metal finish. I purchased the rifle from a forum member and replaced only the bolt and gas screw to restore the rifle to correct configuration. Thanks for the follow-up comment TS.
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