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  #11  
Old 12-03-2017, 05:34 PM
lapriester lapriester is offline
 
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Location: Cobb, N California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rock View Post
It's a SA rebuild from 1964. A DAS marked stock with trigger housing bedding would bring it back to a correct SA 60's rebuild condition.
Why do you think bedding will? That was only done to salvage a stock with loose fit. I have two 60's rebuild M1's with original SA DAS circle P 60's replacement stocks on them one an IHC with Birch and one an SA with Walnut. Neither is bedded at the trigger housing.

Last edited by lapriester; 12-03-2017 at 05:46 PM.
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  #12  
Old 12-03-2017, 05:42 PM
lapriester lapriester is offline
 
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Location: Cobb, N California
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Even with prices seemingly low restoring the rifle you have will probably triple the cost of the rifle even if, and that's a huge if, you are lucky enough to find the right parts to do it with. Watch the auctions on-line for something correct or nearly so. You'll save yourself a bunch of $ and probably years of frustration searching for parts. I wouldn't doubt a correct rifle bought at auction from CMP might even be cheaper than what you plan to try and do.
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  #13  
Old 12-03-2017, 07:59 PM
Ed Byrns Ed Byrns is offline
 
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SA#3.56 numbers have "O79" as a "Heat Lot.
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  #14  
Old 12-03-2017, 10:22 PM
steelap steelap is offline
 
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Location: North AL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lapriester View Post
Even with prices seemingly low restoring the rifle you have will probably triple the cost of the rifle even if, and that's a huge if, you are lucky enough to find the right parts to do it with. Watch the auctions on-line for something correct or nearly so. You'll save yourself a bunch of $ and probably years of frustration searching for parts. I wouldn't doubt a correct rifle bought at auction from CMP might even be cheaper than what you plan to try and do.
Or just buy a CMP Correct Grade (WWII) for $3000.

"Life is Good!"
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  #15  
Old 12-04-2017, 10:28 AM
utex88 utex88 is offline
 
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Location: Plano, TX
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Consider yourself fortunate to have received a WWII serial number, I requested one and it didnít happen. I did get a matching barrel to a 1955 SA with a LEAD rebuild marking on the receiver. I also got CMP wood. Th best news about the rebuild; itís gonna be a great shooter with parts that are like new and exhibiting virtually no wear. Also, the new stock (its beautiful black walnut) when finished with boiled linseed oil looks gorgeous with lots of grain. It also fits tight as a tick, which enhances accuracy. Shoot the snot out of it! Watch some of the old WW II training videos on YouTube, they are very useful for learning how to use and zero your new rifle. Enjoy it, your rifle sounds like a winner!
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  #16  
Old 12-04-2017, 11:48 AM
Rock Rock is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lapriester View Post
Why do you think bedding will? That was only done to salvage a stock with loose fit. I have two 60's rebuild M1's with original SA DAS circle P 60's replacement stocks on them one an IHC with Birch and one an SA with Walnut. Neither is bedded at the trigger housing.
I'm not convinced of the loose fit theory yet. There are just too many of these bedded SA rebuild walnut stocks.

I'm pointing out what many of us see on these SA 60's rebuilds. The birch replacement stocks don't have the bedding. The walnut stocks have the bedding. It's likely there are exceptions but no one knows for sure at this point.

Also, it could be possible that a DAS marked walnut stock, without bedding, could be from an original rifle produced in the 50's, that replaced the rebuild stock that was originally assembled to a rebuild rifle.

If the op chooses to restore his rifle to SA 60's rebuild configuration, adding a bedded walnut stock will make the op's SA 60's rebuild complete. An unbedded DAS marked birch stock will also accomplish this.

Nothing is written in stone on this subject. I believe that rob30-06 is trying to investigate this.
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  #17  
Old 12-06-2017, 06:49 AM
rob30-06 rob30-06 is online now
 
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Location: Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rock View Post
I'm not convinced of the loose fit theory yet. There are just too many of these bedded SA rebuild walnut stocks.

I'm pointing out what many of us see on these SA 60's rebuilds. The birch replacement stocks don't have the bedding. The walnut stocks have the bedding. It's likely there are exceptions but no one knows for sure at this point.

Also, it could be possible that a DAS marked walnut stock, without bedding, could be from an original rifle produced in the 50's, that replaced the rebuild stock that was originally assembled to a rebuild rifle.

If the op chooses to restore his rifle to SA 60's rebuild configuration, adding a bedded walnut stock will make the op's SA 60's rebuild complete. An unbedded DAS marked birch stock will also accomplish this.

Nothing is written in stone on this subject. I believe that rob30-06 is trying to investigate this.
Guys,
I have looked at literally 100's of SA rebuilds looking for a production (SA, HRA or IHC) stock that went thru Springfield in the 60's and did not receive the trigger group bedding. I have always been positive they are out there but after looking at a lot of stocks I was not able to point to one and say "there's one!" with confidence......until just the other day.
This is not as simple as it might seem. It is complicated by the fact that production stocks are marked the same as the rebuilds.
So I felt I had to establish a rule.
The stock needed to show obvious signs of going thru a rebuild. Typically this means obvious signs of sanding. It could also be that the stock showed faint remains of an earlier stamp.
I have seen some pretty clean-looking SA production stocks on 60's SA rebuilds and cannot but speculate on those because they did not look like they had been thru a rebuild, and I was looking for obvious proof and not speculation. You could make a list of reasons why a clean-looking production stock was on the rifle, but it would be a list and not a conclusion.

Well one of our members and noted Rebuild fanatic recently acquired a rifle with a SA Walnut production stock that had obvious signs of being thru a rebuild. It had obvious sanding around the area of the original cart, the grip area and on the forend. It was also correctly stamped from an SA rebuild with a DAS and had the sans-serif P in circle proof they used on some rebuilds.
It had no bedding as is typically seen on most of the SA rebuilds, so I feel it may be the first I have come across.
There is always danger in evaluating any stock from photos, but I do have to say I was convinced. That stock had some additional interesting history but not related to this subject.
I also agree with the statement that non-production, replacement Birch and Walnut stocks typically do not have the bedding. I have yet to find any of those with bedding from Springfield.
If any of you believe you have a Walnut production stock that went thru rebuild at Springfield in the 60's and DOES NOT have the trigger group bedding I would love to get some photos of it.

Thanks and I appreciate all you guys that take the time to send me photos.

Rob

The other unicorn I have been looking for is a 60's Springfield Rebuild with a properly marked stock that has the wood added in the trigger group lock-up area. So far I have not seen any which is beginning to make me believe that they only did the bedding.
Always on the lookout, though.
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  #18  
Old 12-06-2017, 01:32 PM
csm14thbn csm14thbn is offline
 
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Rob30-06
I have a WIN that went thru a SA rebuild in the 60s. It has bedding in the stock. Let me know if you want info/pics? It was my first M1 thru the DCM. Paid a whopping $95 for it in '96.
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  #19  
Old 12-06-2017, 03:29 PM
rob30-06 rob30-06 is online now
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csm14thbn View Post
Rob30-06
I have a WIN that went thru a SA rebuild in the 60s. It has bedding in the stock. Let me know if you want info/pics? It was my first M1 thru the DCM. Paid a whopping $95 for it in '96.
Sent you a PM
Rob
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  #20  
Old 12-06-2017, 11:47 PM
Rock Rock is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 857
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Rob, I think a good discussion is getting started here. It deserves a thread of its own. Your post here could start it off....

SA 60's Rebuilds With Bedded Stocks

Quote:
Originally Posted by rob30-06 View Post
Guys,
I have looked at literally 100's of SA rebuilds looking for a production (SA, HRA or IHC) stock that went thru Springfield in the 60's and did not receive the trigger group bedding. I have always been positive they are out there but after looking at a lot of stocks I was not able to point to one and say "there's one!" with confidence......until just the other day.
This is not as simple as it might seem. It is complicated by the fact that production stocks are marked the same as the rebuilds.
So I felt I had to establish a rule.
The stock needed to show obvious signs of going thru a rebuild. Typically this means obvious signs of sanding. It could also be that the stock showed faint remains of an earlier stamp.
I have seen some pretty clean-looking SA production stocks on 60's SA rebuilds and cannot but speculate on those because they did not look like they had been thru a rebuild, and I was looking for obvious proof and not speculation. You could make a list of reasons why a clean-looking production stock was on the rifle, but it would be a list and not a conclusion.

Well one of our members and noted Rebuild fanatic recently acquired a rifle with a SA Walnut production stock that had obvious signs of being thru a rebuild. It had obvious sanding around the area of the original cart, the grip area and on the forend. It was also correctly stamped from an SA rebuild with a DAS and had the sans-serif P in circle proof they used on some rebuilds.
It had no bedding as is typically seen on most of the SA rebuilds, so I feel it may be the first I have come across.
There is always danger in evaluating any stock from photos, but I do have to say I was convinced. That stock had some additional interesting history but not related to this subject.
I also agree with the statement that non-production, replacement Birch and Walnut stocks typically do not have the bedding. I have yet to find any of those with bedding from Springfield.
If any of you believe you have a Walnut production stock that went thru rebuild at Springfield in the 60's and DOES NOT have the trigger group bedding I would love to get some photos of it.

Thanks and I appreciate all you guys that take the time to send me photos.

Rob
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