Go Back   CMP Forums > CMP Sales > CMP Bolt Action Rifles
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-17-2019, 08:59 AM
sakorick sakorick is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Linneus, Missouri
Posts: 621
Default MARK I question

My MARK I has the letter A under the date. Anyone know what it means?

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-17-2019, 09:02 AM
chuckindenver chuckindenver is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 2,689
Default

acceptable
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-17-2019, 09:06 AM
sakorick sakorick is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Linneus, Missouri
Posts: 621
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by chuckindenver View Post
acceptable



Hello Chuck.....I believe you however, do you have a source on that?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-17-2019, 09:36 AM
RHScott RHScott is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: NC
Posts: 115
Default

I am under that same impression that these were barrels removed from another receiver for whatever reason and were "A" marked to denote the condition was acceptable for reuse.
__________________
You don't need to be perfect, just better than your competition.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-17-2019, 10:07 AM
John Beard John Beard is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sweet Home Alabama
Posts: 2,859
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sakorick View Post
My MARK I has the letter A under the date. Anyone know what it means?

The "A" means that the barrel is a second-class barrel. And that's documented.

RHScott's statement is correct for barrels up until WWI. A re-used barrel, of course, would be a second-class barrel. But sometime during or prior to WWI, the meaning was expanded to include newly-manufactured barrels.

J.B.

Last edited by John Beard; 07-17-2019 at 10:14 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-17-2019, 10:17 AM
sakorick sakorick is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Linneus, Missouri
Posts: 621
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Beard View Post
The "A" means that the barrel is a second-class barrel. And that's documented.

RHScott's statement is correct for barrels up until WWI. A re-used barrel, of course, would be a second-class barrel.

J.B.
Thanks JB. So what was the criteria for declaring it a "second class" barrel? This particular barrel has a ME of 1.5 and a beautiful bright bore. Does that lower the value of one? I guess I have to shoot it and find out just how bad this rifle is.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-17-2019, 10:38 AM
sakorick sakorick is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Linneus, Missouri
Posts: 621
Default

How could it have been taken off another rifle and be dated 1-19 which matches the serial number 1064694?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-17-2019, 10:48 AM
John Beard John Beard is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sweet Home Alabama
Posts: 2,859
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sakorick View Post
Thanks JB. So what was the criteria for declaring it a "second class" barrel? This particular barrel has a ME of 1.5 and a beautiful bright bore. Does that lower the value of one? I guess I have to shoot it and find out just how bad this rifle is.
The exact meaning of "second class" has not been found. The most logical explanation is that the barrel exhibited a manufacturing flaw (e.g., something out of tolerance) that did not render the barrel unserviceable, but the barrel could not be shipped out as a spare replacement, i.e., the barrel had to be fitted and installed at Springfield Armory and perhaps exempted from a non-critical requirement during final inspection.

One must understand that Springfield Armory supplied spare replacement parts to arsenals and depots all over the world. And if one of those places received a spare barrel that was out of tolerance (although still serviceable), they would probably just throw it away, thereby wasting money and valuable resources.

An example would be excess headspace. A new barrel must not swallow a NO GO gauge. But a used barrel, on the other hand, must not swallow a FIELD gauge, which is longer. So if Springfield made a new barrel and it inadvertently swallowed a NO GO gauge, but not a FIELD gauge, then they couldn't ship that barrel out as a spare replacement. But the barrel is still serviceable. Again, I use that as just an example, not a specific criterion.

J.B.

Last edited by John Beard; 07-17-2019 at 10:51 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-17-2019, 12:18 PM
martin08 martin08 is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 208
Default

So, as I am reading this, an A-marked barrel was likely installed at Springfield Arsenal only, and therefore would not have been considered as a viable part for rebuild purposes at Springfield, or at any other arsenal?

If so, then this would be the original barrel and receiver pairing?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-17-2019, 01:13 PM
sakorick sakorick is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Linneus, Missouri
Posts: 621
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by martin08 View Post
So, as I am reading this, an A-marked barrel was likely installed at Springfield Arsenal only, and therefore would not have been considered as a viable part for rebuild purposes at Springfield, or at any other arsenal?

If so, then this would be the original barrel and receiver pairing?

Good point, Matt. If it's not the original barrel for 1064694 it would be a shame because it's otherwise a nice original rifle with a decent boxed Dewey cartouche, a MARK I trigger, sear and cut off.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:05 AM.