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  #11  
Old 12-20-2018, 12:02 PM
MajorD MajorD is offline
 
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Skohler is correct. If it were mine, I would carefully load up a couple hundred rounds of ammo just powerful enough to allow function and shoot the pistol once or twice a year. Yes still very much a calculated risk. I have owned a few WWI era 1911ís in my time and shot them all, but always with reduced power reloads with lead cast bullets
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  #12  
Old 12-20-2018, 12:31 PM
COL Hal COL Hal is offline
 
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Are you serious? I would never shoot it. It is way to valuable.
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  #13  
Old 12-20-2018, 01:31 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by COL Hal View Post
Are you serious? I would never shoot it. It is way to valuable.
Opinions vary but consider that it was designed as a service pistol; shooting it is, after all, it's purpose. Shooting an obviously used pistol (wisely) shouldn't affect value.

Some firearms probably should not be shot (one of a kind, specific provenance, etc) and of course, if any parts are worn to be a problem, that is a separate issue.
1911s have enough history that the wear points and typical failure points are easy enough to manage.

Make it a monthly match shooter; well maybe not, but shooting occasionally with family and friends; it shouldn't hurt unless Jack Daniels is involved (home brew ammo, modifications, whatever....)

Of course I haven't seen or examined this specific pistol; my opinion may change. But I have no firearms that I won't shoot based on any potential value loss; and I have many dozens of collectible firearms.

JH
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  #14  
Old 12-20-2018, 01:37 PM
bigwagon bigwagon is offline
 
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Whether or not to shoot is an argument unto itself, but whatever decision you make, there is no reason to replace the barrel. Leave it as-is. If you decide to fire it, a pitted barrel isn't going to hamper you in any way. FWIW, I have a 1915 Colt that I have shot quite a bit, although not recently. IMO, firing a few "ceremonial" rounds through a pistol like this on rare occasions this is just fine.
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  #15  
Old 12-20-2018, 04:27 PM
skohler skohler is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZvenoMan View Post
Opinions vary but consider that it was designed as a service pistol; shooting it is, after all, it's purpose. Shooting an obviously used pistol (wisely) shouldn't affect value. JH
I think the argument is not about hurting the value with firing on occasion, but 100+ year old metallurgy and possible soft metals would give me pause. I would, however, suspect a slide fracture would greatly diminish value, unfortunately it is not a "wear" issue, rather a catastrophic one.

A $100 Mosin Nagant, or other comparable milsurp, fire it all day long and if it breaks, throw away or fix cheaply. A family heirloom early 1911, different beast all together.

Perhaps racing a vintage rolls royce that is passed down through the family once a year won't hurt it...
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  #16  
Old 12-20-2018, 06:16 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skohler View Post
I think the argument is not about hurting the value with firing on occasion, but 100+ year old metallurgy and possible soft metals would give me pause. I would, however, suspect a slide fracture would greatly diminish value, unfortunately it is not a "wear" issue, rather a catastrophic one.

A $100 Mosin Nagant, or other comparable milsurp, fire it all day long and if it breaks, throw away or fix cheaply. A family heirloom early 1911, different beast all together.

Perhaps racing a vintage rolls royce that is passed down through the family once a year won't hurt it...
Do 1911 slides have a tendency to become more brittle at xxxx years of age?
Does forged steel loose strength over time or is it some other factor?
My point is the facts and science are there for those who seek them. Both questions above, and pretty much anything else related to 1911 metallurgy is far from a mystery.
Because a pistol is 100 years old, with no other data, does not by any means make it weaker.

I would never encourage anyone to shoot a firearm they didn't want to, but for the same reason I wouldn't tell them there was some risk without the facts.

Like I said, opinions vary. Provide some facts and respect the property owner's decisions when made using facts and logic.
JH
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  #17  
Old 12-20-2018, 08:25 PM
skohler skohler is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steelap View Post
Scott Gahimer (m1911info.com) wrote a very good piece on why not to shoot a historical pistol. It is quoted in this thread from the 1911 Forum.

https://forums.1911forum.com/showthread.php?t=278153

As can be told from the references to the age of the pistols, it was written some time ago, but is perhaps even more pertinent today, especially with respect to a family heirloom.

If you agree with Scott, you may want to print it out for discussion with you children.

Scott is still active in the 1911 community, and is very personable and easy to talk to. I have had several enjoyable discussions with him. You can reach him through his website, which has email and phone info.

"Life is Good!"
Thanks for posting this Steelap.
I know Scott and the linked post above has wise advice. Zevo- did you read through this? I'm not trying to pass myself off as some sort of expert, but the folks in the link are the experts on vintage pre WW2 1911's.

I don't have any sort of vested interest in the OP shooting or not, just hoping to pass along good informed consent for him to ponder.
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  #18  
Old 12-21-2018, 07:54 AM
JarHead RVN 66-67 JarHead RVN 66-67 is offline
 
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You have a wonderful legacy piece that you can pass along to your sons. If you havenít already done this I would suggest that you get as information about your grandfatherís tour of duty with the Marine Corps. You can request his DD214 separation papers, replacement medals and ďany and allĒ records included medical related to your grandfather from the National Archives at this link https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records . Once you get that information it should give you a good timeline of his time in the Marines.

Semper Fi
Jack
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  #19  
Old 12-21-2018, 07:58 AM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skohler View Post
Thanks for posting this Steelap.
I know Scott and the linked post above has wise advice. Zevo- did you read through this? I'm not trying to pass myself off as some sort of expert, but the folks in the link are the experts on vintage pre WW2 1911's.

I don't have any sort of vested interest in the OP shooting or not, just hoping to pass along good informed consent for him to ponder.
Yes sir. That is an excellent explanation. There were one or two minor items in some of the posts I donít agree with, but that, in my opinion, is a great presentation. There is no denying that with any firearm the next shot could be the last, than that chance is affected by many factors, some easily determined and many not.
The only thing I would suggest is that, regarding parts wear, and the known slide stop and similar areas on 1911s, a respectful owner/shooter will pay attention to these and react accordingly. Shooting until it fails with no regard to wear and condition is foolish.

Respectfully
Jh
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  #20  
Old 12-21-2018, 09:22 AM
Logdog Logdog is offline
 
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If your Grandfather was a Marine Captain and you want to know reams about where he was, contact the USMC historical branch. The books out there are written by authors using after action reports and such that the Marine Corps retains, your grandfather would have written some of them. Being legacy, the historians are pretty helpful to requests. Surviving company grade officers were few, so the odds go up that they have documents. The more specific the requests, the easier it is to find. The U.S. Army WWI series has lots of info, but is like watching paint dry finding stuff. Ancestry has lots of info also.
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