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  #1  
Old 02-02-2016, 08:52 AM
juniorloaf juniorloaf is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Central Maine
Posts: 229
Default Replacement Cost of 'M1942' bayo

I picked up a 16" M1905/1942 bayonet a month or two ago (traded for a full bandolier of AP on enblocs), and am trying to figure out a good estimate for a value if I had to replace it. I have seen a fairly wide range of values between WWI/WWII-era blades, years and makes. This is a 1943 UFH with scabbard that says "USN MK 1". What are your thoughts on this one? Is the scabbard correct for the bayonet? Has it been refurbished? Thank you in advance

Link to pictures:

http://imgur.com/a/Dupag
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  #2  
Old 02-02-2016, 09:35 AM
AFJon AFJon is offline
 
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Great resource on bayonets. Won't help with pricing though, but IMHO you got the better end of the trade.

http://www.usmilitaryknives.com/bayonet_points.htm
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  #3  
Old 02-02-2016, 09:42 AM
Bayonet Bayonet is offline
 
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Location: West Virginia
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I do not see anything in particular that would say it has been refurbished, although I would have to handle it to give a more definite opinion.

The scabbard is not "correct" as it was made for the Navy Mark 1 training bayonet but they may have been mated at a later date. Fairly common to see them as a pair these days as the Navy had large numbers on hand that were sold as surplus after WW2 and even more recently. Whether or not the two were mated while still in military service cannot be told, but most serious collectors do not consider them as being correct.

Prices have varied greatly in recent months. Here are three recent ebay sales for you to compare with yours. Realistically, I would place a replacement value at this time as being in the range of $150 - $175.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/WWII-Militar...IAAOSwoydWivDw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/U-S-WW2-1942...p2047675.l2557

http://www.ebay.com/itm/UNION-FORK-H...p2047675.l2557
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  #4  
Old 02-03-2016, 06:17 PM
General ike General ike is offline
 
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Location: NY NY
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Mr. Cunningham or anyone else, will you all clarify why the date is blocked on some of these"1942" models? I remember reading it but a search did not come up with a answer.Thanks Ike
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  #5  
Old 02-03-2016, 07:15 PM
Bayonet Bayonet is offline
 
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The situation exists mostly on PAL made M1905 bayonets. The problem was that the die stamp fixture was set too low or the blade was inserted improperly. The guard was not installed until after the mark stamping was done, and then the guard blocked the bottom of the date. It does occur on other makers, but rarely. Just a production error by what was likely an inexperienced workman.

http://
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  #6  
Old 02-03-2016, 10:13 PM
Moammo6 Moammo6 is offline
 
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Re: Bayonet's Post #3, I offer the fact that a mix of M1905/1942 and M1917 bayos were, in fact, issued with USN Mk1 scabbards to some US Army units on the Korean DMZ as late as the 1960s. The purpose? For use in manual probing for landmines. I was an infantry officer in a rifle company on the Korean DMZ for 15 months. We conducted daily "DMZ Police" patrols thru and about both wartime relic and more recent minefields. While seldom actually used, we had many in the arm's room, and they were issued to patrols or bunker building/maintenance details as desired or needed. I still have a "bring-back" example in my possession--a "PCSing-to-the-World" momento.
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  #7  
Old 02-04-2016, 07:53 AM
juniorloaf juniorloaf is offline
 
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Location: Central Maine
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That's interesting! I don't know how I'd feel about manual probing of landmine fields with a 16" bayonet...

Thanks for all the input everyone
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  #8  
Old 02-04-2016, 08:47 AM
Moammo6 Moammo6 is offline
 
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Manual probing for mines using a rigid wire probe or a bayonet was a standard technique taught to, and used by, combat engineers and infantrymen in WW2 and until the 1960s. I know, I was an enlisted combat engineer "pioneer" before going into the infantry. Really a straightforward technique that in my opinion was as safe as using an electrical mine detector. The bayo was not mounted on a rifle, of course. It was gently, but firmly cradled in the upward facing palm of both hands with the soldier kneeling. When the Soviets and US first started using plastic anti-personel mines, the manual probing method was the only show in town. Just a bit of history.
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  #9  
Old 02-04-2016, 09:06 AM
Bayonet Bayonet is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moammo6 View Post
Re: Bayonet's Post #3, I offer the fact that a mix of M1905/1942 and M1917 bayos were, in fact, issued with USN Mk1 scabbards to some US Army units on the Korean DMZ as late as the 1960s. The purpose? For use in manual probing for landmines. I was an infantry officer in a rifle company on the Korean DMZ for 15 months. We conducted daily "DMZ Police" patrols thru and about both wartime relic and more recent minefields. While seldom actually used, we had many in the arm's room, and they were issued to patrols or bunker building/maintenance details as desired or needed. I still have a "bring-back" example in my possession--a "PCSing-to-the-World" momento.
Thanks for the first hand information. I do appreciate hearing things like this as it does help explain to some degree why we see these scabbards mated with standard bayonets. I appreciate your taking the time to pass on your personal experience.
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  #10  
Old 02-04-2016, 10:40 PM
General ike General ike is offline
 
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Mr. Cunningham as always thanks for the answer and your willingness to share your knowledge!!! Ike
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