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  #1  
Old 07-15-2013, 09:48 AM
JKL JKL is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
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Default High/low number 1903 springfield

I know that the cut-off point for determining a high number 1903 Springfield is "about" the 800,000 serial number range. Is there a more definitive point where you can be assured that you are getting a safe, high number rifle. For example, would you feel comfortable with rifles above 805,000, or 820,000 or 830,000 serial numbers. Is there any other feature that you can check to make sure you are getting a high number. Thanks for any other info you can provide...JKL
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  #2  
Old 07-15-2013, 10:05 AM
ebeeby ebeeby is offline
 
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There really isn't a short answer on that. Check out Col. Hatcher's discussion on this topic in "Hatcher's Notebook" - he was there.
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  #3  
Old 07-15-2013, 10:06 AM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
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No
Many references available, the Springfield records simply do not have a definite number, unlike RIA who apparently managed to record the switch.
Jh
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  #4  
Old 07-15-2013, 12:09 PM
3StrikesNC 3StrikesNC is offline
 
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per the CMP Rule Book;

Quote:

4.1.3 As-Issued M1903 Springfield
The rifle must be a standard issue service rifle that was issued by the U.S.
Armed Forces and be in as-issued condition. Permitted rifles are the Caliber
.30 U. S. Model 1903 and Model 1903 A3 Springfield rifles, except that
Caliber .30 U. S. Model 1903 Springfield rifles manufactured by Springfield
Armory with serial numbers of 810,000 or lower or by Rock Island Arsenal
with serial numbers of 285,506 or lower may not be used in any CMPsanctioned
competition.
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  #5  
Old 07-15-2013, 12:20 PM
FredG FredG is offline
 
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It's extremely important to remember that though Rock Island recorded the specific serial numbered receiver that they began their double heat treatment with as 285507, that receiver was picked out of a bin that contained many other numbered receivers, some above that number and some below that number. In other words, the Rock Island receiver with the number of 285508 was in all probability NOT the next receiver to be double heat treated. It Might have already received a single heat treatment and been assembled on another rifle that had already left the arsenal. Likewise, Rock Island receiver number 285506 Might have been one of the receivers that were afterwards double heat treated. Rifle production at Springfield Armory and at Rock Island Arsenal was not done in strict consecutive order of serial numbers.
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  #6  
Old 07-15-2013, 12:45 PM
JKL JKL is offline
 
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Thanks to all who responded...very good information. Since I am primarily concerned with Springfield manufactured rifles, I think the CMP restriction on serial numbers prior to 810,000 will be a useful guide. I guess there is no definitive answer as to which are really "safe", but there is a lot of guidance on which numbers should obviously be avoided....JKL
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  #7  
Old 07-15-2013, 12:58 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
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Location: AL
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Plenty of local gunsmiths seem to be wiling to check out the LNs and certify them based on inspection, and maybe voodoo!
If you find such a gunsmith, run!

Jh
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  #8  
Old 07-15-2013, 02:17 PM
Calif-Steve Calif-Steve is offline
 
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If, I recall it correctly Rock Island destroyed a pile of receivers and that was how they arrived at SN 285507, not a guess from looking in a bin. Springfield finished up all receivers in house and thought 800,000 was a safe number. No one can look at a receiver and safe this one is OK by mere eye-balling it. Complicated matter, to say the least.
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  #9  
Old 07-15-2013, 03:07 PM
HughUno HughUno is offline
 
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Location: Northern VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calif-Steve View Post
If, I recall it correctly Rock Island destroyed a pile of receivers and that was how they arrived at SN 285507, not a guess from looking in a bin. Springfield finished up all receivers in house and thought 800,000 was a safe number. No one can look at a receiver and safe this one is OK by mere eye-balling it. Complicated matter, to say the least.
however, one CAN look at the barrel end and note that if it is a WW2 barrel stuck on, one can be reasonably assured that (besides lasting up to 194x) the receiver HAS in fact "survived" TWO (2) high pressure proofing rounds (HPT rounds). As steel doesn't "get old," one can be pretty sure that short of firing something with MORE PRESSURE than 70,000 PSI, the rifle will hold together fine..
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  #10  
Old 07-15-2013, 03:28 PM
RedSpecial RedSpecial is offline
 
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Location: PBC, FL
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Excuse my ignorance, but what pressures are found with a normal, say m2 ball cartridge?
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