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  #1  
Old 04-21-2011, 07:23 PM
skjos skjos is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
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Default How to repair cracks in stock???

I took this stock off my IHC and replaced it with a USGI birch replacement stock. However, I would still like to fix it up if possible. With the cracks shown in the pictures, could it be fixed by the methods I have shown, or is there a better way? How would they have done it during an arsenal rebuild (or would they just have thrown it away)?


Last edited by skjos; 04-21-2011 at 07:37 PM.
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  #2  
Old 04-21-2011, 07:29 PM
sparx sparx is online now
 
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How tight are these (side) cracks? If you twist the stock slightly will they open up?

Is the crack on the bottom open or tight? Can it be spread if you push an Xacto knife blade into the start of the crack at the mag well?

Do you have images without the editing?
sparx
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Old 04-21-2011, 07:32 PM
MTC29 MTC29 is online now
 
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The Greeks won't throw any stock away and here is an example of an arsenal repair to the underside of a stock with a crack very much like yours with what I am told is called a "Dutchman repair".:

This one had the wood dowel installed to repair a crack:


I am betting that with some time and care you can do a much better looking job than those repairs!
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Old 04-21-2011, 07:44 PM
skjos skjos is offline
 
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Unedited pictures:



Exacto knife cannot seperate the side crack, but the bottom crack can be opened; however by opening it I feel the crack will propogate.
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Old 04-21-2011, 07:46 PM
nate nate is offline
 
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On the cracks that you are going to dowel, drill the holes so the dowel is a snug fit and drill just past the crack, then pour some epoxy in the hole and use the dowel like a piston and force the glue out into the crack until you get as much glue in there as you can. If you recess the dowel and cut some plugs of walnut and glue them on top of the dowel with the grain on the plug going the same direction as the grain in the stock they will be hard to see when you are finished. On the other one I would use some brass pins on an angle from each side after you get some glue in the crack. Good luck and let us know how it works out.
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Old 04-21-2011, 07:47 PM
skjos skjos is offline
 
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I wonder if my dremel would do a good job cutting the slots for the dutchman repair. Thanks for the pics, they help me visualize what I might need to do.
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Old 04-21-2011, 07:55 PM
Punch the Clown Punch the Clown is offline
 
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If it's a collectible stock send it off to Rick Borecky for repair.
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  #8  
Old 04-21-2011, 08:41 PM
skjos skjos is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by comm pogue View Post
a little trick i found to help me, on the cracks in the magazine well area (your picture on the right). i use a old lag bolt & nut about a 1" long, brass toliet bolts work best. stick it in the mag well sideways and very SLOWLY back off the nut with a wrench. this opens up the split so you can get in your glue. after you glued it, turn the nut back inboard and your set to lightly clamp it. HTH Semper Fi
That sounds easier than the dutchman repair. I guess I could clamp a ways up the stock (to prevent the crack from growing) while I open the lower part of the crack, inject the glue, and then clamp it down.

The dowel method nate suggested would work for the other crack.
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Old 04-21-2011, 08:53 PM
hotshoe hotshoe is offline
 
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Surgical tubing works well for clamping a stock.
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  #10  
Old 04-21-2011, 09:17 PM
sparx sparx is online now
 
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What I would do on the bottom crack is get an 18 gauge syringe, spread the crack with an Xacto blade and shoot it with Brownell Acraglass from the inside to the exterior. Protect the exterior with masking tape adjacent to the crack, allow the ability to view the material passing through the wood. You can insert the needle in several places to get a complete application. Then heat the material from the back with a heat gun.
Remove the spreader, in the case the Xacto blade, and clamp the part but do not use excessive pressure. Wipe excess before it sets up.

If you cannot get an 18# needle into the crack you can drill tiny holes from the inside to facilitate glue insertion.

I have done many repairs like this and you do not need any reinforcement.

The side crack can be repaired with the same material from the inside. But you will need to use a block on the stock side to clamp from left to right. It appears another clamp will be required from top to bottom.

Clamping is an art in itself, sometimes I use up to 6 clamps to secure a repair during drying.
Don't forget the wax paper between block and stock or it will become a major issue.


I put a Garand stock back together that was completley cracked in two at the mag well with acraglas, and used no dowels. If you mix the material properly it will not fail.

Your cracks are simple repairs as I see it that require no reinforcement.
You could even increase the side crack, or cause a larger crack drilling to install dowel rods.

sparx
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