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  #1  
Old 01-30-2011, 10:15 PM
Vos Parate Vos Parate is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: MO
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Default Cracked M1 Hanguards

I have some old hanguards that have been mutlple biscuit type repairs. I'm going to use them to practice crack repair. They are pretty greasy and I cleaned them up as best I could with MS.

What is the best way to flush grease and oil out of the cracks? What would be the best type of glue to use?
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Old 01-31-2011, 01:22 AM
a31b20 a31b20 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: California
Posts: 473
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I would try acetone to flush out the oil ( in a well ventilated area ) and use "thin" CA (cyanoacrylate) glue.. AKA crazy glue. The CA that is available from a hobby shop works best, Zap-a-Gap or Hot-Stuff brands come to mind. Hobby shops also sell pin point applicator tips to use with thin CA. CA works very well when there may be oil left behind. Apply after you clamp the crack shut . It will wick its way into the crack.Watch your fingers...it works great on skin too....that is what it was developed for ....medical use instead of sutures.I have done a few rear hand guards with good success.... use a dowel of proper diameter and a hose clamp to hold everything in place ....wax paper between the dowel and the hand guard acts as a good release agent... prevents the dowel from becoming part of the hand guard.

CA can cause parts to heat and the vapors will irritate nasal passages... so use caution. Good luck,Rich
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  #3  
Old 01-31-2011, 06:34 AM
NeuNamen NeuNamen is offline
 
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anyth8ing that actually degreases will alsotend to take off th efinish. no big deal because refijnishing can aklso make it easier to hide the cracks after the gklue dries. oiven cleaner is as good as anything eklse as long as you fklush well and klet it dry overnight.

Cryanolite actually EXPANDS when it dries and tends to leave a more visible crack compareed to carefully applied and well-clamped wood glue. they both work fine as far as strength is concerned. handguards also have a strqange curve and are not the easierst things to claimp. rubber tubing comes in handy, but you will still oftyend need to figure out weights and home-made "jigs" (ammo caqns etc.) to keep the cracks tightly compressed against each other.

Last edited by NeuNamen; 01-31-2011 at 06:37 AM.
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  #4  
Old 01-31-2011, 07:03 AM
Det. Jason 714 Det. Jason 714 is offline
 
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Location: Northern MN
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CA also works wonders developing latent finger prints, I use often in our lab. When used over a heat source, the fumes seek out the natural oils and create a "concrete" fingerprint. Pretty cool. For your handguard clean with acetone and use woodglue, there is a new type that is stronger than wood, the name escapes me. If you have a few experiment to find what works for you.
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  #5  
Old 01-31-2011, 07:26 AM
ulflyer ulflyer is offline
 
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Location: Lexington, NC
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Have had several guys say they use Gorilla Glue with good success. Ive not tried it myself.
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  #6  
Old 01-31-2011, 12:39 PM
a31b20 a31b20 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeuNamen View Post
anyth8ing that actually degreases will alsotend to take off th efinish. no big deal because refijnishing can aklso make it easier to hide the cracks after the gklue dries. oiven cleaner is as good as anything eklse as long as you fklush well and klet it dry overnight.

Cryanolite actually EXPANDS when it dries and tends to leave a more visible crack compareed to carefully applied and well-clamped wood glue. they both work fine as far as strength is concerned. handguards also have a strqange curve and are not the easierst things to claimp. rubber tubing comes in handy, but you will still oftyend need to figure out weights and home-made "jigs" (ammo caqns etc.) to keep the cracks tightly compressed against each other.
Beg to differ.. CA does not expand....thin CA depends on close fitting joints to work properly .... been using it for years building RC aircraft....Gorilla Glue an isocyanate will expand if not clamped.It has the ability to "find its way out of a crack"...it will foam. Which ever glue you choose it should be clamped..

Rich
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  #7  
Old 01-31-2011, 07:58 PM
vetterli vetterli is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 184
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I made a wooden jig to repair the lower tops, Short piece of 2x4 for base, then 1/2 x 1/2 wood strips to put the cover in, Like a open box and use a clamp on the top to draw down to the right size of the box. I use JB weld dyed with brownells glass kit black.
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Old 01-31-2011, 08:40 PM
12BVet 12BVet is offline
 
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Location: Easley, South Carolina
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I used Gorilla Glue to fix a completely broken front handguard. The wood had split about 3/8" from the bottom edge of one side of the handguard, next to the area where the oprod sits. First, I degreased the handguard with lacquer thinner (which removed all the finish as well). After allowing the handguard to dry overnight, I lightly moistened the surfaces I wanted to glue back together, then I applied a thin layer of the glue to one piece of the wood. I put the wood back together and used some blue masking tape to hod everything aligned while it dried. The next day, I removed the tape, used a razor blade to scrape off the foamy, dried glue which oozed from the joint, then I sanded the handguard. After re-staining it with Transfast wood dye, I applied BLO. You can't see the repair now unless you look very closely.

Hope this helps.
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  #9  
Old 01-31-2011, 10:06 PM
USMCdad67 USMCdad67 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
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+1 on the Gorilla Glue. It's a polyurethane glue, and was designed to work with naturally oily woods like teak, so it's an excellent choice. The reason for moistening the wood is the water swells and opens the wood fibers. The glue works into, grabs, and hardens the fibers. And, after sanding, poly glues take a stain well. I just did a repair on a front handguard with this method. The repair is absolutely invisible.(BTW, I am a professional woodworker, and often work with these glues, with great success.)
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  #10  
Old 01-31-2011, 10:12 PM
Silver Shamrock Silver Shamrock is offline
 
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Location: Minneapolis
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vetterli....if you could...post a pic of your jig.
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