CMP Forums

CMP Forums (http://forums.thecmp.org/index.php)
-   M1A/M14 (http://forums.thecmp.org/forumdisplay.php?f=100)
-   -   Everything you always wanted to know about the M14's history and development(long read) (http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=279975)

A Seabee 04-08-2021 06:45 PM

Everything you always wanted to know about the M14's history and development(long read)
 
I found this by accident, and can't stop reading

https://miamirifle-pistol.org/wp-con...ion-100815.pdf

DP68 04-08-2021 07:53 PM

Thanks for sharing

A Seabee 04-08-2021 08:27 PM

here's an interesting tidbit

M14 RIFLE HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT 83XM21 and M21 (NSN 1005-00-179-0300) - $1278.00Mk 14 Mod 0 (NSN 1005-01-525-7718) - $2400.00Mk 14 Mod 0 (NSN 1005-01-531-7324) - $3361.30The M39 EMR (NSN 1005-01-553-5196) unit price in October 2008 was $3,930.17.Receiving the M14 - When the new-in-box M14 rifles were received by the Army and Marine Corps, oil was present in the gas cylinders because of the factory lubrication. Thus, the U. S. Marine Corps issued Technical Instruction TI-02648A-15/6 to deal with the problem. This Technical Instruction references U. S. Army TM 9-1005-223-12 which requires that each M14 rifle to be field stripped, cleaned, and lubricated prior to firing. The gas cylinder, gas piston and gas cylinder plug should be thoroughly cleaned and dried the first time the rifle is cleaned.In the U. S. military, the selector shaft lock was installed on most M14 rifles so that only semi-automatic fire could be employed. However, the Table of Organization for the U. S. Marine Corps required three automatic riflemen per rifle squad when the M14 was the issue rifle. In Viet Nam, U. S. Marine Corps units such as the 1st Marine Division 1stReconnaissance Battalion and the Combined Action Platoons (CAP) were equipped with selector switches on their M14 rifles in Viet Nam. Automatic fire was used in ambush situations and by the patrol point man when making enemy contact.Reliability - Reliability of a weapons system is a timeless characteristic of paramount importance. Military personnel engaged in combat will not trade the reliability of a weapon for anything, including weight. The weight of the rifle is not considered a burden but a life sustaining tool. That tool must function when needed. The M14 rifle has proven itself trustworthy in many places and in many climates.The M14 rifle was tested for sustained fire in 1960 at Fort Benning, GA. In particular, one M14 rifle was fired continuously at a rate of sixty rounds per minute for 3080 rounds. The test ended when the chambered rounds started pre-igniting because of the hot barrel. The barrel never failed to stabilize the exiting bullets. The front end of the stock and the hand guard eventually burst into flames but the rifle continued to fire. At Fort Benning, the M14 rifle was found capable of firing 600 rounds in heavy rainfall without any malfunctions.

Gewehr43 04-09-2021 09:36 AM

I'd posted this review, for lack of better word, earlier.......
There was some criticism of the M14 after being fielded in Vietnam:

http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=273730

It's very minor (and noone would care) but the summary of the Canadian gun laws/importation of the M14's is off.

Also Some may disagree with the timeline of the M14 Enhanced Battle Rifle..........

Ted Brown 04-09-2021 01:26 PM

Lee Emerson's publications on the M14 can be purchased through lulu.com. It's available in print and on CD. Lee has been researching and writing about the M14 for close to 20 years and is currently offering his fourth edition. Being an engineer, Lee's books are more technical than most other writers publications. They are a wealth of information.

Random Guy 04-09-2021 06:44 PM

I agree with Ted, those books have a wealth of information (BTW, his 2019 edition is actually the 6th Edition). I had the pleasure of working with him on editing the 6th Edition with regard to my research on the various post-M21 Product Improved sniper rifles. Vol 1 is my favorite given all the overall historical information in that volume.

https://i.imgur.com/9bXHdeA.jpg?1

Quote:

Also Some may disagree with the timeline of the M14 Enhanced Battle Rifle....
Here's a quick recap, it all started in 2000-01 with Navy SEALS wanting a more compact and modern M14, and a small arms engineer at Crane who was assigned as the Mk 14 Program Manager and worked on the program from 2001 to 2011. He was also subsequently the Contract Officer Representative (aka COR) for all branches of the US military re purchases of the various SAGE chassis systems during that decade plus time period. I am trying to get him to write a book on Crane small arms history, so we shall see:

https://i.imgur.com/mf3E7Yq.jpg?1

2004: Mk 14 Mod 0 gets its NSN (although it appears some field use may have already been underway)
2005-6?: Mk 14 Mod 1 gets its NSN
2007: USMC M39 gets its NSN
2007-8?: US Army EBR-RI gets its NSN (1005-01-D17-0487)
2011: Navy Mk 14 Mod 2 gets its NSN

So the SAGE chassis extended the M14 service life by a decade plus, but it was heavy and the EBR-RI was an interim SDM solution.

After the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were winding down, the US Army procurement folks finally put out a new SDM contact in 2016, as they sought to replace the 6200 M14-based EBR-RIs with something more modern, lighter, and sustainable from a procurement and lifecycle support perspective. H&K won the contract, and here's Emerson's quick history on that subject:
https://i.imgur.com/3wKDBSU.jpg?1

...Anyhow, I highly recommend Lee Emerson's books for anyone interested in M14 history.

Gewehr43 04-09-2021 07:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Random Guy (Post 2034027)
I agree with Ted it's a wealth of information (BTW, his 2019 edition is actually the 6th Edition). I had the pleasure of working with him on editing the 6th Edition with regard to my research on the various post-M21 Product Improved sniper rifles. Vol 1 is my favorite given all the historical information in that volume.

https://i.imgur.com/9bXHdeA.jpg?1



Here's a quick recap, it all started in 2000-01 with Navy SEALS wanting a more compact and modern M14, and a small arms engineer at Crane who was assigned as the Mk 14 Program Manager and worked on the program from 2001 to 2011. He was also subsequently the Contract Officer Representative (aka COR) for the military purchase of all the various SAGE chassis systems during that decade plus time period. I am trying to get him to write a book on Crane small arms history, so we shall see:

https://i.imgur.com/mf3E7Yq.jpg?1

2004: Mk 14 Mod 0 gets its NSN (although it appears some field use may have already been underway)
2005-6?: Mk 14 Mod 1 gets its NSN
2007: USMC M39 gets its NSN
2007-8?: US Army EBR-RI gets its NSN (1005-01-D17-0487)
2011: Navy Mk 14 Mod 2 gets its NSN

So the SAGE chassis extended the M14 service life by a decade plus, but it was heavy and the EBR-RI was an interim solution.

After the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were winding down, the US Army procurement folks finally put out a new SDM contact in 2016, as they wanted to replace the 6200 M14-based EBR-RIs with something more modern, lighter, and sustainable from a procurement and lifecycle support perspective. H&K won the contract, and here's Emerson's quick history on that subject:
https://i.imgur.com/3wKDBSU.jpg?1

...Anyhow, I highly recommend Lee Emerson's books for anyone interested in M14 history.

So which version did the OP post?
I assume the 1st edition?

And you are quoting which version or who?

Random Guy 04-09-2021 08:56 PM

Original post is 2010 copyright, so my guess is 2nd or 3rd Edition. (Free text online Vol 1).
The 5th edition was dated 2016 if I recall correctly, with current 6th edition is 2019.
Emerson keeps updating and refining his books as time and research allows, which is great.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:06 AM.