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-   -   Coloring Sight Marks (http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=141746)

n7gxz 07-07-2014 06:28 PM

Coloring Sight Marks
 
I've seen several pictures posted where folks have colored (usually with white) the markings on the sights which makes them much easier to see.

What product is being used to do the coloring and what procedure to do it?

Kevin

meplat 07-07-2014 06:55 PM

Grease pencil. Just apply and rub off. It fills the marks and remains . Lipstick might work too and give you more choice of color

:D

The Original Youngblood 07-07-2014 07:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by n7gxz
I've seen several pictures posted where folks have colored (usually with white) the markings on the sights which makes them much easier to see.

What product is being used to do the coloring and what procedure to do it?

Folks use an assortment of things, but usually paint (like the enamel used in model building) or nail polish if they wish the job to last.

Whenever I paint sights, I carefully tape-off the areas where I do not want the paint (if I perceive the possibility that it may migrate) ... I also leave a tab on the tape so that I can easily remove it right after I apply the paint.

I often use toothpicks to apply the paint.

TIP: If you want to paint your blued sights something other than white, first paint them white (and allow them to dry) before applying the color paint. The white "base" brightens the color.

n7gxz 07-07-2014 07:47 PM

Thanks for the ideas guys.

Kevin

lapriester 07-08-2014 01:47 AM

Grease pencil or China marker won't last. Buy a paint pen from Home Depot or a small bottle of white model paint. Paint over the numbers, letters to fill in the stampings. let dry and wipe off the excess around the stampings lightly with a cloth dampened with brake cleaner.

You get these results and they last:
http://pic80.picturetrail.com/VOL100.../408771189.jpg
http://pic80.picturetrail.com/VOL100.../408771190.jpg

rob30-06 07-08-2014 02:14 AM

Lacquer Paint Pen from Brownells
 
Brownells sells lacquer paint pencils that are used for this purpose (white is probably most common). There is a technique to doing this without making a mess.
my method:
- cleand area around the lettering with alcohol
- rub the paint pen into the lettering recess (just smear it in so all recessed areas are covered well).
- with a peice of cardboard (like the stiff back of a note-pad), wipe off the excess. The cardboard acts like a flat surface and will allow the paint to stay in the recess. Always use a fresh peice with each wipe.
- use Mineral Oil on a que-tip and remove the color haze left by the wiping. Be careful not to get the oil on the paint you want to leave since it will break it down as well.

On the cleanup, I normally do as good as I can and then lket it sit for a day or so to let the paint "set". Then I go back and do the detail cleanup.
Paint will set hard in a few days. Cleanup will be much harded if you wait too long.

If you screw it up, no problem, just start over. A couple trys and you will be an expert.

Rob

The Original Youngblood 07-08-2014 06:01 AM

Quote:

markings on the sights
RATS! I read that as just sights, sorry! Yes grease pencil or lacquer stick as already mentioned.

I have also used the model enamel on a few. While doing the enamel is more labor intensive, it may be a bit more permanent.

I found that the key to painting them is the "wipe clean" approach. If you use cloth or the like it will not only remove the excess but also the paint in the markings.

I cut up pieces of paper (old printer rejects) and use those, with a drop or two of low odor mineral spirits applied as the clean-up medium for wiping away excess.

With this method, each location requires multiple "wipes". Each piece of paper can be used for a single wipe, otherwise you will just make a mess. ;)

CalvaryCop 07-08-2014 02:09 PM

Back in the '50s when I worked in a shipyard they had paint sticks that looked like a crayon.The steel workers marked up the plates to be welded with regular crayons whic the painters had to remove before painting. When the paint sticks were subsequently used they could paint over them. I had one of those for marking my guns which lasted many years. ( the sticks that is.When the tip dried over you just scrape it back a little and your good to go.)

galyc4@att.net 08-11-2014 10:32 PM

They still have those paint sticks your talking about Production Tool Supply

zippysrifle 08-12-2014 04:36 AM

99 cent white nail polish from WalMart.


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