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  #1  
Old 05-13-2021, 09:10 AM
PloughMud PloughMud is offline
 
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Default Korean War Garands

I located the thread below in searching, but I am not sure if this has come up more recently. If one wanted to have a “Korean War correct” Garand is getting one from CMP as such possible.

I am not saying used in the war, but correct for the war. My personal opinion is yes.

However, is there any new research or evidence since this thread below?

http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=106198
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  #2  
Old 05-13-2021, 09:41 AM
Det. Jason 714 Det. Jason 714 is offline
 
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Very possible. I would look for a Post war barrel date- 46-49 possible 50. And lots of WW2 features, lockbars, gas cut cylinders etc.... Look at pictures from the Korean war, I myself have yet to see anything but lock bars for the rear sights.
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  #3  
Old 05-13-2021, 10:00 AM
Quarterbore Quarterbore is offline
 
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That other thread is interesting and I have pondered what a correct for the Korean War Garand would look like too and reading the points there and thinking about manufacture and shipping times then obviously a late WW2 gun with late WW2 parts is probably a safe bet for being something that would have been more common than an 1950's build Springfield or HRA.

Now, I know well that the T105 was introduced in mid/late 1945 so I assume one could reasonably expect that the sight could have been upgraded so the Type 3 lockbar and T105 could be either way.

Funny, I had been thinking I needed a HRA for an example of a Korean War gun but in reality as suggested they started in Jan 1953 when things were ending. My may 1945 Springfield is far more likely to be what was used.

Thanks for the topic! Never got into studying this before as I only focused on WW2 period myself.

To the OP, any Winchester you buy would be pre-Korea or just look for a WW2 period Springfield. To make it Korean War period all you need to do is find early parts and there are plenty out there so that it would not be an expensive project as long as you don't try to hunt down parts to correct to the gun's manufacture as then things get salty. A Korean war gun likely could have a rebuild stock and they are also cheap and plentiful as opposed to original cartouched stocks. I have been lucky when I order with the COM as every time I included a sticky only asking for a WW2 serial gun and they got me one every time! Some early WW2, some very late but I made out well. Good Luck!

Last edited by Quarterbore; 05-13-2021 at 10:08 AM.
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  #4  
Old 05-13-2021, 10:38 AM
Ronwall Ronwall is offline
 
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The Korean War technically began when North Korea invaded South Korea on Jun 25, 1950 and ended on Jul 27, 1953 when the United Nations Command reached an armistice with China and North Korea. Depending on how you define “Korean War correct” it could be any M1 made or rebuilt before 6/25/50 or any rifle newly produced between 6/25/50 and 7/27/53. Opinions differ but I consider a SA-52 to be newly produced so depending on your opinion of a SA-52 if it's unaltered since being built those could be considered “Korean War correct" too.

To answer your inquiry not counting the five SA-52's I have in my collection within the past few years I've managed to acquire three correct SA 4 mil M1's manufactured within the Korean War timeframe directly from CMP so yes they are out there. One of them even has a USMC serialized tag. FWIW after sending data sheets to ihcfan55 I have had all three rifles confirmed as having the correct parts for the serial numbers. Obviously when I see a 4 mil in a CMP store and I suspect it could be correct I'll buy it every time. Those early 4 mil SA rifles are beautiful rifles and they have a very intriguing story behind them.

Btw if you find one do not start changing parts until you research. Many of them has been unknowingly uncorrected by changing parts that were thought to not be correct. Some of them not having a high hump gas lock would be at the top of the list.

Last edited by Ronwall; 05-13-2021 at 10:40 AM.
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  #5  
Old 05-13-2021, 12:22 PM
PloughMud PloughMud is offline
 
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Thanks for replies. Ronwall - this may open a can of worms that has been opened here a couple thousand times. I probably should have chosen a better word than “correct” above. I think each CMP rifle is a historically intact rifle, and when we “correct” them by swapping parts we are forever altering original history. When I DO correct parts now, I keep the parts I remove. This works out in my mind. But each person’s rifle is their own property. Some correct to it leaving the factory, some refinish and sand, some leave as is.

Bottom line I 100% get what you are saying. I know CMP may replace parts but to me that is just as significant as military replaced parts - it was part of it’s “official” service life. To each his own but I’d buy an 85% as is from and untouched after rifle from CMP than one corrected. Of course if they documented the preservation/restoration process and had the 15% corrected parts that would help.

Feel free to sell me one of your 4 mils you speak of😜. Those sound like a perfect win/win. I have Irish whiskey and coffee to trade.....
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  #6  
Old 05-13-2021, 02:03 PM
Firstflabn Firstflabn is offline
 
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Good luck on your hunt. Any effort to remember those guys who prevented us from losing the Cold War in the 2nd inning gets my support.

"Korean War" to me means 'in theater.' If you mean consistent with Korean War-era, that's fine, but a different animal. Two perfectly fine terms to avoid ambiguity.

US ground forces in Korea got within about 50k of their ceasefire peak two years previous, so replacement, not initial issue demand would have been the main flow. Ground action slowed considerably after mid-'51, so demand by US forces also dropped that way. On the other hand, ROK ground forces expanded by about 900k after mid-'51, so going by percentages, that would seem to be the major destination for anything serviceable.

With the extreme shipping times, the odds would seem to be stacked against any meaningful quantities of new rifles getting there before Jul '53. During WWII, the desired (not always achieved) reserve level for the Pacific was 120 days plus another 50 days reserve in US. No idea what the standard was for KW, but by 1953, the pipeline had had plenty of time to get filled.

A footnote in Huston's KW logistics book has always grabbed me. Citing a history by the Japan Logistics Command, Huston said by mid-'52, 71% of infantry weapons being used in Korea came from rebuild operations in Japan. No indication of which were returns from Korea being repaired and which were "left behinds" (new term I just invented) from storage in Japan.
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  #7  
Old 05-13-2021, 03:18 PM
2761377 2761377 is offline
 
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it is more helpful and correct to refer to the post-war new manufacture rifles as"Replacements for Korean War Garands" rather than "Korean War Garands".

and we know that many of the Non-Springfield post-war rifles were used in the MAP, which started years after the Korean Armistice.
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  #8  
Old 05-13-2021, 04:58 PM
JT76 JT76 is offline
 
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I’ll have to look for it but i have a photo of my great uncle in Korea in 1952 and his m1 has t105 sights on it.
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  #9  
Old 05-13-2021, 10:31 PM
M1 sniper M1 sniper is offline
 
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I like to think that my win-13 with 4-51 sa bbl was there. I’m a big Korean
War buff as my great uncle served and was killed In 9-1950 at the Pusan
Perimeter.
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  #10  
Old 05-14-2021, 05:06 AM
USriflecal30 USriflecal30 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PloughMud View Post
I located the thread below in searching, but I am not sure if this has come up more recently. If one wanted to have a “Korean War correct” Garand is getting one from CMP as such possible.

I am not saying used in the war, but correct for the war. My personal opinion is yes.

However, is there any new research or evidence since this thread below?

http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=106198
Still possible. I just picked up a 1947 SA rebuild in January, w/47 barrel, correct stock, all other parts except the bolt were late WWII stuff. Couldn't believe how "correct" it was for 1947.

http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=275174

Last edited by USriflecal30; 05-14-2021 at 05:08 AM.
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