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  #1  
Old 05-01-2018, 05:23 AM
Basstar Basstar is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 15
Default To Weight Or Not To Weight

In reading the SR rules it appears that rifles not equipped with scopes may be weighted but rifles equipped with scopes have a lower weight restriction.

RRA sells both a buttstock weight as well as a fore end weight but with both added my calculations show the RRA NM with both weights added tipping the scales at 16 pounds or so. Also in watching some of the YT videos of SR competitions I hear mention of rifle weight but nothing in particular.

I'm a total newbie but it would seem the heavier weight would be a benefit in the prone positions but perhaps not so much in the standing offhand but what the heck do I know?

First, am I correct that this weight may be added for SR and secondly I'd like your opinions as to whether or not the added weight and especially that much weight is a benefit.

Thanks for helping the new kid.
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  #2  
Old 05-01-2018, 08:34 AM
Rootsy Rootsy is offline
 
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There is NO weight limit for a NM AR. I repeat, there is NO weight limit for a NM AR.

If you are reading the GAMES rulebook and looking at modern military AR then yes, 8.5 lbs max.
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  #3  
Old 05-01-2018, 09:29 AM
Gewehr43 Gewehr43 is offline
 
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Location: Denver, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rootsy View Post
There is NO weight limit for a NM AR. I repeat, there is NO weight limit for a NM AR.

If you are reading the GAMES rulebook and looking at modern military AR then yes, 8.5 lbs max.

OP:
What he said................

For the GAMES and Modern Military, there are weight limits.
For Service Rifle, there is no weight limit..............
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  #4  
Old 05-03-2018, 11:55 AM
OpenSightsOnly OpenSightsOnly is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Sunny Southern California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Basstar View Post
In reading the SR rules it appears that rifles not equipped with scopes may be weighted but rifles equipped with scopes have a lower weight restriction.

RRA sells both a buttstock weight as well as a fore end weight but with both added my calculations show the RRA NM with both weights added tipping the scales at 16 pounds or so. Also in watching some of the YT videos of SR competitions I hear mention of rifle weight but nothing in particular.

I'm a total newbie but it would seem the heavier weight would be a benefit in the prone positions but perhaps not so much in the standing offhand but what the heck do I know?

First, am I correct that this weight may be added for SR and secondly I'd like your opinions as to whether or not the added weight and especially that much weight is a benefit.

Thanks for helping the new kid.

If you already have the RRA NM rifle, dry fire that rifle and get to know how it feels then add the buttstock lead.

Then decide if you need to add the handguard lead weight. Take the time to figure it all out.

My service rifle is about 17lbs and its perfect for me.
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  #5  
Old 05-03-2018, 12:15 PM
Roadkingtrax Roadkingtrax is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Arizona
Posts: 8,633
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Adding a weight was a huge turning point in improving rapids for me.

Weight isn't the same as heavy, but just in an amount to assist the rifle in settling quicker and keeping you on the black during recoil.
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  #6  
Old 05-03-2018, 12:26 PM
Basstar Basstar is offline
 
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Thanks so much everyone for your in put and for sharing your knowledge and insights with me. This is truly appreciated.
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  #7  
Old 05-03-2018, 01:18 PM
HighpowerRifleBrony HighpowerRifleBrony is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 231
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I had a rear weight, did well for a while (mid Master), then my Offhand dropped 5 points for no apparent reason. No obvious changes, but I was leaking wider 9s.

I put a front weight in as well and it was a good bandaid that affected my endurance in Prone Slow, but the scores were back up.

Then for fun, I put my rifle back to "GI" for a match. Removed the weights, hood, put the standard width post in, and the single stage trigger. The 0.200" aperture and lock time were more awful than expected. The post seemed to help elevation control. Balance was okay, and overall weight was a relief in prone.

So I replaced only the hood and trigger, and shot just as well as when fully kitted, but at 60% the weight. I improved into HM territory with that setup.

I think my eye/finger timing needed refining and the greater inertia slowed it enough to see, but also the weight may have helped reform the index points in my position and that happened to improve it when the weight was removed.

Only above 10mph gusts may I start losing a couple points Offhand compared to a heavier rifle. I've learned to yank it back in better than most people.
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  #8  
Old 05-03-2018, 08:49 PM
Basstar Basstar is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighpowerRifleBrony View Post
I had a rear weight, did well for a while (mid Master), then my Offhand dropped 5 points for no apparent reason. No obvious changes, but I was leaking wider 9s.

I put a front weight in as well and it was a good bandaid that affected my endurance in Prone Slow, but the scores were back up.

Then for fun, I put my rifle back to "GI" for a match. Removed the weights, hood, put the standard width post in, and the single stage trigger. The 0.200" aperture and lock time were more awful than expected. The post seemed to help elevation control. Balance was okay, and overall weight was a relief in prone.

So I replaced only the hood and trigger, and shot just as well as when fully kitted, but at 60% the weight. I improved into HM territory with that setup.

I think my eye/finger timing needed refining and the greater inertia slowed it enough to see, but also the weight may have helped reform the index points in my position and that happened to improve it when the weight was removed.

Only above 10mph gusts may I start losing a couple points Offhand compared to a heavier rifle. I've learned to yank it back in better than most people.
Thanks for this excellent and detailed description.
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  #9  
Old 05-06-2018, 05:20 AM
martydabney martydabney is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 78
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weight can be a good thing if you have the stamina to maintain your position throughout the match. that takes lots of dry firing which you should be doing regardless of how much weight you have.

balance is more important than the amount of weight you use though. I use a Stealth ballistics weight in my UBR stock which is about 40 oz and a 3/4 length cuff in the front. this puts the center of gravity directly on the delta ring which is where I have my support hand.

I decided to add weight for those times we shoot in high winds. anyone who shoot the CM cup at Butner on Sunday came to the harsh realization that shooting offhand in that wind can be detrimental to your scores.

I have done a tremendous amount of experimenting with weights and can shoot a non weighted rifle just as well as I can a weighted rifle when the wind isn't blowing but I keep the weight because of those days when the wind is blowing, like Perry for instance.

it can also help for recoil management during rapids.

it can even help in slow prone. wind can push the shooter around just as easily as it can offhand.

whatever you decide to do, practice with it. keep notes and plot your strings in a databook. you can find trends over time that will help determine what works best for you. if you make a change, give it a few months before saying yay or nay. the old saying of "a new broom sweeps best" applies here. you could make a change and think it's the best thing ever but over time, you may find out otherwise.
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  #10  
Old 05-07-2018, 06:22 AM
Basstar Basstar is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 15
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Thanks so much everyone for this insight. I have the strength and stamina to handle the weight and from what I read here it appears that adding the weight seems to be at least neutral but with a positive bias so since I'm beginning anyway I'm going to start out with the weight added.

Based on the comments here I don't really see any downside to the added weight except from the standpoint of one's ability to handle it.

Time will tell and again thanks.
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