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  #11  
Old 06-25-2022, 02:10 PM
moose moose is offline
 
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That said there is one western gun type I would not feel bad about shooting steel case in.

The H&K roller locker system. G3 , PTR91 and others.

Because of the fluted chamber, and the roller locking system.. the steel case ammo works better and eases extraction. The steel doesn't flow into the flutes like brass does.

So if you have a roller locker gun, steel case is actually better.
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  #12  
Old 06-25-2022, 03:10 PM
milprileb milprileb is offline
 
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You owe 42Springfield a Christmas Card ! LOL

Really a great thread with solid information and options. Take a victory lap.
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  #13  
Old 06-25-2022, 03:31 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moose View Post
That said there is one western gun type I would not feel bad about shooting steel case in.

The H&K roller locker system. G3 , PTR91 and others.

Because of the fluted chamber, and the roller locking system.. the steel case ammo works better and eases extraction. The steel doesn't flow into the flutes like brass does.

So if you have a roller locker gun, steel case is actually better.
It's the fluted chamber, not the roller locking system that makes this ammo less of a problem. And it's the lacquer sticking to the chamber that causes those extraction problems in non-fluted chamber rifles.
Many articles and posts exist regarding the "sticky bolt" issue with Mosin Nagants, (makes sense, as just about all 7.62x54R ammo is lacquer coated steel) and so far there is no sure fire remedy (other than using a different lot of ammo). I have ammo that works fine in some Mosin Nagants but simply will not extract in others (and I have tried all the chamber and bolt cleaning tricks), yet some other ammo (also steel/lacquer" often works fine in those rifles.
I do have 2 SVT-40s, the Soviet Garand, so to speak. Gas operated with fluted chamber (tilting bolt lockup, so similar to an SKS but in no way related, and not a roller locking system).
Every lot of "sticky" ammo I find with my Mosin Nagants gets directed to the SVTs. It has never had a hiccup (except 1 ruptured case), devours everything; steel, brass, lacquer, whatever.

Back to the OP, I've shot various brands of steel cased ammo in one of my ARs, no problems, but SOME ARs have issued with it, not due to the steel, but the powder. Some of the (again, cheap) powder is very dirty and gums things up. No damage to the AR, just more jamming.

Conceptually you could tumble some used steel cases, reload them (using a known, proven bullet, primer and powder) and get great performance. Better than brass; probably not. And the tumbling (and initial firing) removed some lacquer, so the cases WILL rust, at least here in AL.
But what have you saved?

A good friend, engaged in this same discussion, picked up some 9MM steel cases from an IDPA match. He tumbled them, reloaded with some typical bullets, primer and powder (too long ago to remember, but they were typical, not match components). He proceeded to win the next match, which was by no means a small/out of the way match with no real competition. And had no performance issues at all.

In many firearms I have no problems shooting steel cased ammo. But as I get older (not necessarily wiser) my focus tends more towards pure performance rather than simple function. So as long as I can get brass ammo for my "accurate" firearms, why consider steel? Especially since 99% of steel ammo has a bullet of unknown composition/performance specks, an unknown primer and unknown, especially from one carton to another, unknown powder.
It will go bang, and the bullet will probably head in a somewhat predictable direction, but that's not why I shoot my M1a.
And there is some speculation (and probably hard data if you look) that the steel cased ammo has a higher rate of failures, but my guess is that is due to the "cheap" part and not the steel itself.

JH
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  #14  
Old 06-26-2022, 10:59 AM
milprileb milprileb is offline
 
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Curiosity drives a lot of things on reloading bench. 30 yrs ago I came across a coffee can of once fire WWII steel 45acp cases at a gun shop and the owner told me to take them home free . They'd been there forever and no one wanted them. I tried reloading some and while function of the 20 that I reloaded was no issue, I had tons of brass at hand and tossed the steel cases away. I don't regret it as steel does rust, tougher on dies and with abundance of brass cases then and now, I don't see any future in any steel cases for my reloading purposes.

Steel cases...my opinion is yes you can but why bother reloading them. Life is about choices.
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  #15  
Old 06-27-2022, 10:43 AM
Det. Jason 714 Det. Jason 714 is offline
 
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"Better dead than red" we used to say, lol. In all seriousness I wouldn't use it in my M1A. That stuff is made for Communist bloc rifles where wear isn't a worry.
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