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  #31  
Old 09-11-2021, 07:26 PM
BishopofBling BishopofBling is offline
 
Join Date: May 2021
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frederick View Post
I saw a YouTube video and the guy was saying that most if not all gun oils have a mineral oil base. The manufactures just add stuff to make them sell. I've been trying plain mineral oil with pretty good results, so far.
For the most part I think that's true. I'm partial to Ballistol because I shoot a lot of corrosive and I like that it emulsifies in water and leaves a thin coating of oil after I flush metal parts that have come into contact with corrosive salts.

I use Mobile grease for my M1s and I believe you can use Mobile oil to lube gun parts. What's nice are some oils act as mild solvents/cleaners such as Ballistol or CLP.
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  #32  
Old 09-14-2021, 11:04 PM
MajorD MajorD is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Arizona
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For the 30 or so years I have owned my M1 not to mention all my other guns, I have never wiped down or coated the exterior with anything. I have never had any rust issues at all, even when I lived in a very humid area ( while my gun safe was set on a pallet off the basement floor and had a golden rod dehumidifier in it, sometimes the floor of my basement would sweat moisture and be very damp) I don’t think I have wiped down a gun of any sort with oil in decades at least.
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  #33  
Old 09-15-2021, 07:00 AM
TomD999 TomD999 is offline
 
Join Date: May 2021
Location: Fabulous Manchvegas NH
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Hiya,

Couple things to keep in mind when storing firearms and other items that are prone to oxidation:

1) Consistent temps are more important than % of humidity. If you look at most recommendations of machine tool storage guidelines you'll see something like: "Storage: Temperature stable environment between 20 and 90% relative humidity, non-condensing" It's the temp swings from warm to cold and back again that cause the moisture to condense on metallic components and start the oxidation process. This is why "goldenrods" are effective, they promote stable temps so that condensation is less likely to occur.

2) Gypsum board off-gassing in "residential security cabinets": Many "economy gun safes" are now made in China. These safes use gypsum board as fire insulation and weighting. It's well known in the construction trades that gypsum board from China off-gasses contaminates in humid environments. One of the gasses emitted is hydrogen sulfide, which is corrosive to metals. Being an enclosed container concentrates these gasses and could lead to corrosion.

Tom
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  #34  
Old 09-15-2021, 12:04 PM
JW_Pepper JW_Pepper is online now
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomD999 View Post
Hiya,

Couple things to keep in mind when storing firearms and other items that are prone to oxidation:

1) Consistent temps are more important than % of humidity. If you look at most recommendations of machine tool storage guidelines you'll see something like: "Storage: Temperature stable environment between 20 and 90% relative humidity, non-condensing" It's the temp swings from warm to cold and back again that cause the moisture to condense on metallic components and start the oxidation process. This is why "goldenrods" are effective, they promote stable temps so that condensation is less likely to occur.

2) Gypsum board off-gassing in "residential security cabinets": Many "economy gun safes" are now made in China. These safes use gypsum board as fire insulation and weighting. It's well known in the construction trades that gypsum board from China off-gasses contaminates in humid environments. One of the gasses emitted is hydrogen sulfide, which is corrosive to metals. Being an enclosed container concentrates these gasses and could lead to corrosion.

Tom
Good points. I need to find out what's lining the inside of my 2007 Liberty Safe.
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  #35  
Old 09-15-2021, 01:41 PM
Trepang Trepang is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Location: Calvert County, MD
Posts: 74
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Originally Posted by JW_Pepper View Post
Good points. I need to find out what's lining the inside of my 2007 Liberty Safe.
Pls let us know what you find out - I have two Liberty Fat Boys.
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  #36  
Old 09-15-2021, 06:21 PM
Me Not You Me Not You is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 441
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All of my firearms get a protective coating on the metal of some sort. Usually I use grease when I initially reassemble the rifle. Often I use BreakFree on the exposed metal after use. In some cases I used Johnson's paste wax. I live in a humid climate with wildly varying temperatures with no corrosion at all. Occasionally I work of firearms for folks I know, and sometimes find corrosion, often inside the stock, usually because the metal is unprotected.
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  #37  
Old 09-15-2021, 08:44 PM
TomD999 TomD999 is offline
 
Join Date: May 2021
Location: Fabulous Manchvegas NH
Posts: 62
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Hiya,

Here’s a page I found that details some of the issues of firearm rust inside safes with carpet, chip board and gypsum drywall board.

https://www.secureitgunstorage.com/gun-safe-corrosion/

Tom
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  #38  
Old 09-15-2021, 10:16 PM
Chief Chief is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Illinois
Posts: 195
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danny View Post
Use something other than CLP. Use a bore cleaner (not Hoppe's) for bore cleaning, an oil or grease for lubrication, and something designed for metal protection.
Why not Hoppes?
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  #39  
Old 09-16-2021, 11:16 AM
horticattleman horticattleman is online now
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Cajun Country, LA
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As a former Marine, it is in all of our blood to use CLP. However, I will never forget what our Corpsman told us one day while handing out rubbers before liberty. Double up gents because remember, highest quality...to the lowest bidder. That's what CLP is in my opinion.
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  #40  
Old 09-16-2021, 02:20 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: BHM AL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief View Post
Why not Hoppes?
Well, it's been around what, >100 years, and just about everyone has or does use it. No matter what, it cleans well. Something else may clean "better (how do you define that, uses less patches, takes 2.34 scrubs less, costs 3x per ounce so must be better, smells more "modern".....) but, like gun grease, they pretty much all get you to the same place.
Remember, the old oils/cleaners were probably "best" once, they are in no way harmful or bad now.

I have craft bear snob friends, for them it's "better" to pay more for a hint of dingleberry in their oatmeal stout.
Their craft beer, my Guinness Draft; they cost close (it's discretionary spending after all), get us to the same place so why care?

Personally I have tried many, old and new. None "did not work", some clean quicker, some are better all purpose, some are better on old nasty Mosin Nagants fresh from the importer.
None have harmed any of my firearms, all did what they needed (cleaned or lubricated).

Consider this: Especially with a milsurp, you need to get it "clean", oil for rust/corrosion/lubrication, and grease as required. All of the gun cleaners will clean, all oils will oil, all greases, well you know.
I am sure a Garand would be fine greased with Crisco if the molyteflonsilcon Tactical Grease *With Velcro* was unavailable (For those who haven't lived in the south, Crisco, probably illegal now, is a vegetable based grease used for cooking). It may need re-applying more frequently, may come off more in the rain (or may be better, who knows), and you can cook with it.

My decades in the milsurp world have seen the most overthinking surrounding "the best" cleaner/oil/grease, closely followed by "should we tell others their milsurp is "wrong" or somehow not correct", with MW/TE in a close 3rd!

Well, time for my Guinness while I expect disturbing PMs from those with no "sarcasm detector"

JH
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