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  #1  
Old 01-12-2022, 06:57 PM
M1GarandBill M1GarandBill is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Location: Franklin, NC
Posts: 2
Default Building up a Carbine barreled receiver

My son wants me to help him build an M1 Carbine, from the barreled receiver on up. Anyone have this available? This would make a great winter project. He wants WWII GI parts only, no after market or new stuff. Also we do not want re-welded receivers either. Please advise. Thanks, Bill
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  #2  
Old 01-12-2022, 07:59 PM
.Steve. .Steve. is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 908
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It can be done.

When you are done, you will:
-have a random assemblage of odds and ends of parts with no hint of authentic “life” in them.
-have spent more than buying the equivalent condition intact carbine.
-and then get to figure out which parts were discards by someone else that are now impairing function of your assemblage.
-Then you can sell the extra bolts that did not headspace correctly in your receiver.
-Then sell your headspace gauges.

Its not really a project. You can assemble the whole carbine in 5 minutes, IF, you have all the parts. If you are intending to assemble a bolt and a trigger group, good luck and add 10 minutes. This assuming you have the bolt tool.
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  #3  
Old 01-12-2022, 08:32 PM
GotSnlB28 GotSnlB28 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: WI
Posts: 1,576
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It's true you'll have more $$ in it than buying the full carbine, unless you luck into some good parts deals which is not easy these days.
If you are unfamiliar with m1 carbines there will be a learning curve to find good parts. But it's not hard. More than likely you can find a bolt that headspaces fine on the first try. I've had 1 over the years that didn't.
I had a lot of fun building up several shooters with the best parts I could find, many NOS. It was not cheap but they run perfectly and shoot tight groups (for carbine standards). Even buying an intact carbine, there are sometimes issues to be worked out, so that won't guarantee you anything either. But it's usually not too hard to get them running as they should.
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  #4  
Old 01-13-2022, 06:48 AM
35 Whelen 35 Whelen is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Texas
Posts: 290
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M1GarandBill View Post
My son wants me to help him build an M1 Carbine, from the barreled receiver on up. Anyone have this available? This would make a great winter project. He wants WWII GI parts only, no after market or new stuff. Also we do not want re-welded receivers either. Please advise. Thanks, Bill
When I was a teenager, my father and I disassembled some nice military Mauser rifles for the actions. He then helped me build hunting rifles based on these actions. The resulting rifles are worth far less than they were in their original form, but the things he taught me and especially the time we spent together are priceless. So the first course of action is to do what you and your son want to do want to do, not what a collector thinks you should do.

Barreled actions aren't cheap, but worth every penny for the type project you're interested in. FYI, there's a Saginaw on Gunbroker right now for $1250. If you shop carefully, USGI parts can be found worth the money. Apex Gun Parts offers USGI parts at decent prices and in many cases you can select the manufacturer, if you wish. There's an individual on Auction Arms from whom I've bought quite a few USGI parts for very fair prices.

I've swapped bolts many times on carbines and have yet to encounter a problem. The .30 Carbine, like the 9mm and many others, headspaces on the mouth of the case. I've never heard of anyone encountering headspace issues when they swapped barrels on their Glocks or 1911's, as so many do.

I hope you find what you want, and hope you'll keep us posted on the progress of your project. Enjoy the time with your son!
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  #5  
Old 01-13-2022, 07:15 AM
.Steve. .Steve. is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 908
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Got&35 are both perfectly correct. Such builds can work out and be fun.

I was speaking to the likelihoods. If the OP already knew enough about carbines, knew about parts sources, knew about assembly techniques, or had the tools, the question would have not been asked. Having to ask is a Nieman-Marcus problem. If you have to ask the price, you probably can’t “afford” the item as the sales clerk said to the customer.

If with some understanding of the potential pitfalls, it seems a good idea to build a carbine, have at it and enjoy.
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  #6  
Old 01-13-2022, 08:08 AM
majorfa majorfa is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Georgia
Posts: 783
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Sir,
In February is the "GUN SHOW OF SHOWS" in Louisville, KY, hoping to go this year and from what I have heard you can find just about anything there. It may be worth going to as you may find everything you need in one place. As I understand it, the military part is on Thursday and Friday. I love the carbines and have 8, 3 my son and I built from the ground up. I travel a lot and anytime I pass a small gun shop or pawnshop, I stop in to look around and I ask if the have any old military gun parts, you will be surprise what you find. I went into a rural pawn shop looking for a 1903, guy said I was a day late, he had just sold one a guy had brought in along with 2 barrels, I asked what kind on barrels and he didn't know. I asked to see them and he brought them out, one was an Winchester M1 Garand and the other was a Winchester M1 Carbine, the Garand barreled had a ME of 2 and TE of 2, the Carbine looked to be NOS, guy said he would take $75.00 for both, I offered $40 and we settled on $50.00. I broke my arm getting my wallet out, LOL. Yes this was a 1 in a lifetime (this was in 2015) find but deals are out there. Think of it as buying a classic car and do your homework so you will know what you are talking about and take your time. In the 3 carbines we built, I have less than $1000 in each one. Good luck
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  #7  
Old 01-13-2022, 08:41 AM
Jakeroub Jakeroub is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Mass
Posts: 1,585
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I suggest that you buy a complete rifle, then disassemble it. You and your son can then build it up from a barreled receiver. You’d have achieved your goal in the easiest, most cost effective way.
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  #8  
Old 01-13-2022, 09:17 AM
Det. Jason 714 Det. Jason 714 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Northern MN
Posts: 8,071
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I did this project a few years ago with a Rock-ola receiver. At the time "what a country" had carbine kits. I bought an "unissued " barrel, turns out it is a Herlo replacement barrel. Being a garand guy I had no clue what that meant until I asked. I was able to get one of the good lots for a herlo so there are no issues, parts kit from what a country was very poor. but functional, The parts I ended up using were reparked, I sent the receiver, barrel and bolt to Shuff for installation and head space. All that being said, it was a project, but I'm happy with the final product.
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  #9  
Old 01-13-2022, 11:48 AM
Prepper_Pig Prepper_Pig is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Van Buren, Arkansas
Posts: 88
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Don't let the extra cost of parts deter you. The time spent with your son and the memories he will have will make the rifle priceless to him for the rest of his life.

When buying parts be careful you're getting legitimate GI parts if that's what you want. I've been burned by SARCO and at least one other vendor. Read those descriptions carefully.
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