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  #1  
Old 05-16-2021, 10:22 AM
junnie junnie is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 127
Default Bluing

Friend gave me a very old 410 double barrel, full of rust etc. perhaps I'll have the shotgun blue, any suggestions????

Danke. Junnie
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  #2  
Old 05-16-2021, 10:25 AM
Rich/WIS Rich/WIS is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Corbin, KY
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Believe there are some issues with hot bluing guns with soldered ribs, but don't recall what they were. If getting it blued might want to have it gone by a company/gunsmith familiar with the old guns.
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  #3  
Old 05-16-2021, 11:55 AM
Nodakdad Nodakdad is offline
 
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Location: Fargo, ND
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If you get it too hot it can soften the solder from what I read, not sure of it's true. I made up a hot bluing tank and don't think I run it much over 250 or 275 would have to look at my notes. A good rust blue is fairly easy and cheap to do at home.
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  #4  
Old 05-16-2021, 01:37 PM
Pinecone Pinecone is offline
 
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Rust blue it.
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  #5  
Old 05-16-2021, 02:51 PM
MajDave MajDave is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Spring Lake, MI
Posts: 497
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Had a friend rust blue my dads old shotgun that was very rusty. He had left it in a soft gun case on the basement floor for years before I found it after he died. It really turned out nice and I have it hanging up in my workshop.
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  #6  
Old 05-16-2021, 05:13 PM
navyrifleman navyrifleman is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 1,105
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The key to a good refinish job is in the preparation. Clean the shotgun thoroughly first and use a solvent that will dissolve any crud, old oil, powder residue, etc.

Use a fine steel wool to remove any loose rust inside the barrel and outside. A fine emery cloth might also be needed. Fine is the key word.

Depending on the extent and amount of rust, you might need to use a rust remover like Naval Jelly. If you do, be sure to read the directions carefully, and only do a small part to begin with. Do NOT use it on case hardening. If it says to leave it on for only ten minutes before washing it off, do not leave it longer, as it will tend to harden and discolor the metal. Again, this would only be something to use on a really hideously rusted piece.

When you have the rust mostly off, rub the entire gun down with Simonize Chrome Cleaner to get any residual rust or discoloration out. The metal will shine like silver.

Before you use any kind of blue or other finishes like cerrocote bake on or epoxy like spray on, etc. You have to completely degrease the metal.

You will do well to start in a small area that is not very visible - such as on the bottom of the barrel. See how it looks and then do the rest of the gun.

If you go the blue route, keep in mind that it is a rusting process, and you have to re-oil the gun every day for a while until the process is finished.
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  #7  
Old 05-17-2021, 09:26 PM
SA1942 SA1942 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Missouri
Posts: 219
Default Bluing

If you want to have it blued, send it off to someone who does it for a living. Someone who doesn't know what they are doing can turn something valuable into something that is not.

Hot blue is ideal at 275 F degrees and if it gets too hot (295 F) the parts will turn out reddish orange and will need to be stripped and reblued. Once blued, the parts will need to sit in oil for a while so the bluing actually has time to harden and the oil helps give it a dark black color that you can't get from the blue in a bottle. If the parts are not taken apart, you will have nitrite crystals form around the crack. Case in point, I was given a beat up Ruger MK1 that needed some TLC. I reblued the barreled receiver together and let it soak for some time after hoping the salts wouldn't creep out but they did for several years after. Finally it stopped.

Below is the Marlin 39a that was given to me by my uncle. When I received it, it was completely disassembled in a box that was buffed to hell by my grandpa before he died and was never finished. All the corners were rounded off, deep heavy buffing marks were on the metal, screw holes elongated because he didn't know what he was doing. I worked for a gunsmith at the time spent all summer of 1997 or 1998 with a file and Emory paper trying to fix everything he buffed off and get it somewhat back to its original state. Once I blued it, I it sat in oil for about 2 months and then I pulled it out, cleaned off the parts and then it sat for about 20 years before I decided to put it back together. Long story short, after my grandpa died my mom and uncles divided everything up. My uncle that gave it to me was putting stuff in his truck and knocked the box off in the gravel driveway and it was missing some parts when I got it. So I was too busy with life to stop and get the parts ordered. Problem was, I had a heck of a time finding all the parts. In fact, the hammer screw was impossible to find and I checked everywhere for the part. Finally found a used receiver on GB that looked like it was used for a hammer and pry bar that had the screw. Cost me 35 dollars for the single screw. Guess that's what I deserve for procrastinating.








Last edited by Big_Red; 05-17-2021 at 10:50 PM. Reason: Reduce huge pic size
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  #8  
Old 05-18-2021, 09:21 AM
pa142 pa142 is offline
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 6
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Look up Mark Novak on YouTube. He is a gunsmith that has put up videos about rust bluing. Per his techniques you might be able to convert the rust back to bluing.
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  #9  
Old 05-18-2021, 10:25 AM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: AL
Posts: 4,418
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In my experience .410 shotguns are plentiful; if a rusty one was gifted it's probably not worth much.
So, spending much to get "the best" is not practical.
For a project, then many of the above can be done at home; you have nothing to loose.
One issue with rust will be pitting. The best looking finishes will not cover pitting. The mention about silver solder is also something to examine.
Duracoat/Cerakote finishes are attractive, many be applied over filled in pitting (fill with solder, bondo, acraglass, jbweld, whatever), and are not difficult for the garage collector "gunsmith". You can also use a local shop for less money than blueing. Duracoat has a few "blue" finishes as well as a few parkerize replicas. I have not used Cerakote; most say it's as good/better than duracoat, and I'm sure their color variety is pretty good. A dipped finish (often camo, but the patterns are endless) is also a possibility.

Of course if the shotgun has sentimental value, or is actually worth more than $100 then traditional blueing type finishes may be worthwhile.

I have tried out some new-to-me finishes on these gifted, low value firearms; not much to loose and to me they are entertaining.

This Ballester Molina was a $100 Century Arms 'U-fixem" I got; it had about 2% blueing and 20% rust finish when I got it.
I de-rusted it and blued it in my sink. It looked OK (considering the cost + my 1st attempt). I then saw a friend's work on his test mule and bead blasted it lightly and used Brownell's bake-on finish; that's what you see here. That cost about $12.00 and a few hours work. I wish I had taken before pics and pics of it blued.


This was my 2nd Duracoat test (sold the first; I had $40 invested for $100). It was a $15.00 rusty M14 USGI fiberglass stock from Numrich.


This is up next; I have many Duracoat colors and a few patterns on hand, I just need to decide the colors. It is a $100 Century AMD-65 parts kit with $75 worth of US parts (barrel extension, trigger, etc. to make it legal), a NodakSpud receiver that I had built by Meridian Ordinance. They usually refinish, I asked them to skip that step. Got it back, test fired (works as it should) and now ready for a finish.


I have a few 1903 drill rifles that will probably be duracoated when complete (ones where the cut off weld cleanup won't take a blue/park finish).

JH
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  #10  
Old 05-19-2021, 09:52 AM
captaincalc captaincalc is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 3,243
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Sell it to me. Use the $$$ to buy your wife some artichokes. Or Brussell Sprouts for your Mom. Otherwise follow those other guys. They make sense.
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