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  #1  
Old 05-17-2021, 02:17 PM
SharpShooter82 SharpShooter82 is offline
 
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Default Dark bore / Bright bore

I have seen these descriptions used many times but other than the obvious what is the difference? Is one really better than the other? What are the pro's and con's to each?

Thanks
Eric


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  #2  
Old 05-17-2021, 11:46 PM
Bml Bml is offline
 
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Bright bore is un-corroded and therefore smooth and shiny if cleaned. Dark bore is corroded or worn and dark from wastage of the metal. The pros and cons should be obvious. I notice dark bores will copper foul much worse. As long as the lands and crown are still sharp on a dark bore, it should shoot well.

When assessing the condition of a barrel, personal visual inspection is best. Very good photos are better than other methods. However, a coat of oil will make a finely pitted bore appear bright in photos. ME/TE and peoples descriptions are the worst to determine true bore condition. Peoples grading of a bore varies wildly and gauges only tell you the narrowest point over the length the gauge is inserted. Fouling will falsely reduce gauge measurements and gauges don’t measure pitting in the grooves, belling at the muzzle or severe wear/corrosion at the crown.
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  #3  
Old 05-18-2021, 03:15 AM
rcolarco rcolarco is offline
 
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You can't tell by looking at a bore how it will shoot. A bright bore is nicer to look at, and may increase the price you would pay for a rifle. Conversely, a dark bore may decrease a rifle's monetary value. But a bright bore may shoot terribly, and a dark bore may shoot very well. You can't tell until you shoot it.

Rarely, a dark (pitted) bore can be brightened up by a lot of cleaning. A lot of cleaning. Like in a lot.

If the darkness is just dirt, it should clean up fairly easily.
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  #4  
Old 05-18-2021, 12:35 PM
SharpShooter82 SharpShooter82 is offline
 
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Thanks y'all,,

I did a Google search and what I found was all over the place. Guess the proof is only when you shoot it.

Pay your money,,,take your chances.

I am looking to get an 03A3 and a 1917, soon I hope, just for nostalgia shooting. So dead on accuracy in not the prime factor.

Eric


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  #5  
Old 05-19-2021, 06:40 AM
The Original Youngblood The Original Youngblood is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcolarco View Post
... Rarely, a dark (pitted) bore can be brightened up by a lot of cleaning. ...
Truth.

Too many people when seeing a question about "dark bores" will KneeJerk a response along the lines of, "Oh, yeah, you can clean that up and get it back to shiny. Just get some J-B Bore Paste."

I have always assumed that many of those respondents have never actually worked on any dark bores (OK, maybe ONE) but have read about it enough to become Internet Experts on the subject.

====

16 years ago, in my Barrel Barrel (yeah ... that's what I call it ) I had a pristine-bore K98k TakeOff barrel that I wanted to use.

In the SARCO SGN (Shotgun News) ad I noticed a tiny listing for "dark bore" Yugo-capture German K98ks for $110 ... so I ordered one.

The K98k that they sent me looks just fine on the outside and the bore appeared to long have had things living in it. Fugly ... BUT ... before simply pulling & discarding it (which I would never do) I took some care in attempting to rehabilitate it. Still, fugly.

Last step before Pull & Discard is to actually shoot the rifle to check accuracy of the tomato stake barrel. Out to my backyard range ... and the rifle is quite accurate!

So ... I ordered a second dark-bore Yugo-capture K98k from SARCO and this one came sporting a demil'd barrel (side-drilled) and that K98k is now the home for that pristine-bore barrel.

Just cannot tell until you shoot it. Sometimes even really ugly bores will surprise you. O'course, cleaning them can be a chore ... until you accept a special definition of "clean" for those rifles.
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Last edited by The Original Youngblood; 05-19-2021 at 06:43 AM.
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  #6  
Old 05-19-2021, 08:28 AM
bruce bruce is offline
 
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Re: Bright/Dark bore. I've shot a lot of both. Have had one really pretty two groove 03-A3 that shot poorly regardless of ammo used or efforts taken to get better results. Have had one particularly bad bore on a M-1917 Winchester. Shoot poorly w/ common M-2 ball. Loaded up some 180 gr. round nosed square base bullets and that rifle started consistently shooting less than 2 inch groups. Had several remarkable groups of right at one inch. Have had a couple of worn K-98's that shot poorly w/ common ball but did very well w/ the Rem. 170 gr. round nose ammo. Had a couple of SMLE's from WWI as well as some of the later improvements. Most shot alright even w/ croggly bores. Shoot your rifle. Then make a decision. Sincerely. bruce.
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Old 05-19-2021, 12:33 PM
sigman2 sigman2 is offline
 
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It's always been my policy to pick a rifle with a bright bore and sharp lands. That's a good starting point for accuracy potential. I don't like dark, pitted or worn barrels.
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  #8  
Old 05-19-2021, 01:20 PM
dave tengdin dave tengdin is online now
 
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So what about the description "frosty"? Is that somewhere in between bright and fugly?
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  #9  
Old 05-19-2021, 01:47 PM
ken792 ken792 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave tengdin View Post
So what about the description "frosty"? Is that somewhere in between bright and fugly?
Pretty much. They have an even spread of very tiny pits that give a frosty appearance.

I would personally describe these bores as shiny, frosted, frosted/dark/slightly pitted, and pitted (though it retains some shine). I didnít take these pictures all at the same time with the same light conditions though.







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  #10  
Old 05-19-2021, 02:07 PM
sargeast sargeast is offline
 
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You'd be surprised the number of gunshops and individuals that make almost no effort to clean a "dark bore" before selling. I even purchased a "dark bore" Arisaka (which had a dirty chromed bore). One good cleaning and it was "bright", just as I figured.
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