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  #1  
Old 05-09-2021, 01:39 PM
AWOhio AWOhio is offline
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Columbus OH
Posts: 441
Default M1903 Cracked Stock.

Was shooting my CMP M1903, 821,xxx serial number, Springfield Armory, and the stock cracked at the wrist. May have had a small existing crack that I didn't notice. Isn't too bad of a crack yet. No flex if I try to bend it.

It has an old armory repair elsewhere. No cartouche other than an RA-P

What to do? Get it repaired? Find a replacement old stock? Leave it as is but don't shoot it? Get a plastic stock, chop the barrel and put a scope on it? ( just kidding)

Barrel is a May 1944 replacement. So is not an all original collector piece.

What stock is most appropriate for a 1918 Springfield? Current one is a scant C type with no grooves.

Springfield m1903 crack
Pics
https://imgur.com/gallery/AjMBAKj
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  #2  
Old 05-09-2021, 02:30 PM
Twinson Twinson is online now
 
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Rick B would fix that like it was new.
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  #3  
Old 05-09-2021, 03:13 PM
broomhandle broomhandle is online now
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Augusta GA- X NYC guy
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Hi AwOhio,

A few fellows have mentioned Rick B. as a good repair person. There are a few other people mentioned from time to time.

"IF" your handy you might be able to repair it yourself.

1-Ask questions on the How To section! The guys are a GREAT help for people like me! I know a little about lots of things & just enough to be WRONG at the WRONG time!

Watch all the You tube vids that make sense. The proper glue or epoxy is a very important part of the repair. If it's a old crack it has to be cleaned very well, of all oil or finish. Got clamps?

2- Also take a look & see how tight the rounded base of the receiver fits against the wood, just behind the rear mounting screw.
That is usually the problem.

3- Were your stock bolts TIGHT? I have seen a few stocks crack because in some cases they were dead loose!

Just ADDED to this post: I looked at your pictures- It appears that you have a clearance problem as I mentioned in 2 The wood has apparently shrunk over the years.
Which has added to the stress at that point.

Good luck,
broom

PS Nice guy that I am I'll give you $10 + shipping for your damaged stock. :<)

Last edited by broomhandle; 05-09-2021 at 03:20 PM.
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  #4  
Old 05-09-2021, 03:23 PM
captaincalc captaincalc is offline
 
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Location: Ohio
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Fix it. Nothing to loose. Give careful note to how the receiver fits the wood in back. Shouldn't touch. Doing the repair isn't brain surgery - youtube and the like are your friend.
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  #5  
Old 05-09-2021, 03:29 PM
Mark1 Mark1 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,645
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Rick does outstanding work. But find out his lead time. If he is busy the wait can be long, but well worth it.


Form the pictures it looks like there is no clearance between the stock and receiver tang. If the tang is up against the wood tht is a good probability why the wood cracked.



As there is another repair on the bottom and the round dark spot is most likely a pin that is covered. I would repair the stock.



If you need help as mentioned there is good information on the sticky pages.

I can also help with instructions if needed.
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  #6  
Old 05-10-2021, 07:36 AM
navyrifleman navyrifleman is offline
 
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Posts: 1,096
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The crack in the wrist of your stock is probably the most common in 1903 and 03A3 rifles. It is caused by recoil over time and often indicates loose guard screws or a missing/loose rear guard screw bushing (a metal tube in the drilled wood).

These cracks are easily fixed and almost invisible when repaired correctly. The repair involves cleaning the cracked area of all grease and dirt, very carefully expanding the crack just enough to inject an epoxy type glue into it, and then tightly clamping the stock until the glue sets up.

Search this forum for other threads on this subject, and you will see some very detailed discussion and comments regarding suggestions for successful repair of the crack.
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  #7  
Old 05-10-2021, 08:05 AM
bruce bruce is offline
 
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Location: Georgia
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Contact Rick B. Straight up, excellent work. Sincerely. bruce.
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  #8  
Old 05-10-2021, 08:57 AM
Jorjenboy Jorjenboy is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Location: Fredericksburg, VA
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There is a good glue called Hot Stuff (Use the thin) that will penetrate even the smallest of cracks. Using that and clamps can almost make them invisible... Take a look at YouTube on this. Available on Amazon...
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  #9  
Old 05-11-2021, 10:56 AM
AWOhio AWOhio is offline
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Columbus OH
Posts: 441
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Good call on the lack of wood clearance at the tang. The wood is in contact with the receiver there.

It is hard to tell in the photo, but the old arsenal repair is a replaced patch of wood, with a covered screw or a dowel. So well done that the seam is barely noticeable.
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  #10  
Old 05-11-2021, 05:40 PM
broomhandle broomhandle is online now
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Augusta GA- X NYC guy
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Hi AWOhio,

I'm glad we could help you out.
That is one of the first things I check when I buy a new old rifle!
I usually check that area, barrel clearance & the recoil lug area first.
Made a small but sharp wood chisel to under cut the base of the area to be adjusted, then just slice off a little bit at a time so that area has some clearance.
Seem to recall .010 clearance was mentioned as good #?
We have adjusted a few stocks with matching a slab of wood in the recoil area with good results.
I'll some times bed the area with Acro-glass or the like. for a shooter.
We have a old South American 7mm Mauser that the wood had shrunk very badly. It took about a week for me to get it free of the stock without damage.
I used lipstick to locate all the points wood contact (lots of them) Go slowly was the recommendation of my gunsmith.

Good Luck with it,
broom
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