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  #11  
Old 08-11-2020, 06:31 PM
Random Guy Random Guy is offline
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Northern Virginia
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Still have one of those old heavy barrels with the dovetail cut for the op rod guide. Been debating a build with it for years, but the amount of patience and sacrifice that is required to do what you have done, is no longer in me.

Sure wish I could talk you into an invite when it's done. I would give anything to shoot that type rifle just one more time. Around here we build a lot of cool rifles and a lot of accurate rifles that have attention to detail, excellent g.i. parts, very nice barrels, stocks, etc, etc, .....but what you have done there transcends all of that and even goes above the love we put into them here. I guess the right words would be fervent and unwaivering dedication. Again, well done! I'm impressed again. Hard to do these days.
Thanks for the kind words. If you decide to part with that barrel, please keep me in mind. I do get a little carried away with my replica M14s and sometimes go to the nth degree....my USMC match build is one of several built to the nth degree. If I may digress, here's another one...

Inspiration as seen in Peter Senich's excellent book, The Long-Range War (1994), a picture taken of a Navy/SOCOM M14 Physical Security Sniper rifle taken just after Desert Storm:


..drawing of a US Navy SEAL using one of these circa 1991:


..and this picture associated with the NSN number (1005-01-106-8975):


Here's where my project started back in early 2017: A gently used heavy Barnett barrel, dated 4-93 and marked 'USN' (wish I had one more of these...)


...and a little over year later of collecting parts here's what I had (donor rifle/receiver was a 1992-dated SAI Supermatch w/ rear lug):


...and about 2 years after I acquired the vintage barrel, here's the completed build:


...and here it is with some Desert Strom era goodies:


Its rear lug only (as the Navy switched form double lugs to rear lugs early in production of the M14 sniper rifle):


...Of course about 4 or 5 months after I got my completed replica Navy M14 sniper back from the builder, my buddy near Quantico found me two stocks, one was a USMC match take-off, and the other was an original Navy, double-lugged, black M14 sniper stock. It was kind-of rough, but I did a gentle restoration. Its a neat conversation piece:





...and with a vintage Harris bipod appropriate for the era:


Picture from USA Today newspaper, Feb 27, 1991:


...but I digress. Thanks again for the kind words. I enjoy the challenge of these projects.

Last edited by Random Guy; 08-12-2020 at 10:54 AM.
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  #12  
Old 08-11-2020, 06:35 PM
nf1e nf1e is online now
 
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Keep em coming. Love seeing them done right.
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  #13  
Old 08-11-2020, 06:47 PM
Random Guy Random Guy is offline
 
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Thanks, I have a few more M1A projects that will take me well into 2021 to finish....

Last edited by Random Guy; 08-11-2020 at 06:55 PM.
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  #14  
Old 08-16-2020, 10:16 PM
Danny Danny is offline
 
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Let us know how it does for you in a LR Highpower Match.
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  #15  
Old 08-24-2020, 09:53 PM
rocknut rocknut is offline
 
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I can’t even begin to follow the level of detail you have gone to but it’s sure nice to look at. I’m sure all the work is now well worth it!
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  #16  
Old 09-01-2020, 02:34 PM
Hawk Hawk is offline
 
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I thoroughly enjoy Random Guy's projects. Especially, the research involved and painstaking detail.
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  #17  
Old 09-23-2020, 09:45 PM
NMC_EXP NMC_EXP is offline
 
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Location: New Mexico
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M14 View Post

The whole concept about lugs and accuracy is based on mass. The greater the mass of the front and rear lugs, the greater the accuracy of the rifle. The weight ratios keep the receiver still, along with the bolts that lock it down.
One of the last times I was at Perry I had some down time and ended up in a conversation with a USMC rifle team armorer. I asked him about the advantage of lugged M14s.

He told me: (1) More surface area to absorb recoil so bedding lasted longer. (2) If a rifle malfunctioned they could field strip, make the repair, put it back together, retorque the lugs to spec and the rifle would shoot to its zero from the first shot.
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Last edited by NMC_EXP; 09-24-2020 at 08:46 AM.
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  #18  
Old 09-24-2020, 08:36 AM
Random Guy Random Guy is offline
 
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Quote:
He told me: (1) More surface area to absorb recoil so bedding lasted longer. (2) If a rifle malfunctioned they could field strip, make the repair, put it back together, retorque the lugs to spec and the rifle would shot to its zero from the first shot.
That concurs with my layman's understanding as well. Here's what an old timer told me:

The rear lug increases surface area of the receiver-to-bedding interface, which provides more area to dissipate the recoil forces - and thus increases bedding life somewhat. (in other words, the "bedding breakdown" process occurs slower on a properly bedded, lugged M1A/M14 rifle, as opposed to a bedded M1A but without a rear lug or double lugs).

The double lug and torque screw set-up reportedly allows the rifle to be bedded with the same level of bedding pressure following rifle disassembly, etc - assuming the torque value of the lugs is kept consistent. The downside is the build process is obviously much more involved, as noted in this thread. FWIW, I did request that the builder record torque values of the front and rear lugs be written in the weapon book. Here's the original and well-worn USMC weapon book for a double-lugged match M1A built in 1991 for the late Pat Rogers (my buddy owns this rifle)



...and on the first page several specs are recorded by the original builder, such as barrel type and twist rate, the head space, along with torque values of the gas cylinder plug.
I think the arrow is pointing to the torque value used for the double lugs, which is 60 inch-lbs in this case. I suppose that was to be held consistent when rifle dissembled/re-assembled.



As for weight and accuracy, I suspect in rapid-fire sessions, the added weight of the double lugged rifle likely keeps recoil more manageable for follow-up shots, but this is somewhat of a personal preference. Anyhow, I do hope to get my project back from Accuracy Speaks in the not too distant future, and I'll update this thread once I receive the completed rifle

Last edited by Random Guy; 09-25-2020 at 09:06 AM.
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  #19  
Old 09-25-2020, 09:04 AM
Random Guy Random Guy is offline
 
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You're welcome, I think/hope that is the intent of this forum, and this somewhat verbose thread...
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  #20  
Old 09-25-2020, 02:44 PM
pmclaine pmclaine is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Random Guy View Post
That concurs with my layman's understanding as well. Here's what an old timer told me:

The rear lug increases surface area of the receiver-to-bedding interface, which provides more area to dissipate the recoil forces - and thus increases bedding life somewhat. (in other words, the "bedding breakdown" process occurs slower on a properly bedded, lugged M1A/M14 rifle, as opposed to a bedded M1A but without a rear lug or double lugs).

The double lug and torque screw set-up reportedly allows the rifle to be bedded with the same level of bedding pressure following rifle disassembly, etc - assuming the torque value of the lugs is kept consistent. The downside is the build process is obviously much more involved, as noted in this thread. FWIW, I did request that the builder record torque values of the front and rear lugs be written in the weapon book. Here's the original and well-worn USMC weapon book for a double-lugged match M1A built in 1991 for the late Pat Rogers (my buddy owns this rifle)



...and on the first page several specs are recorded by the original builder, such as barrel type and twist rate, the head space, along with torque values of the gas cylinder plug.
I think the arrow is pointing to the torque value used for the double lugs, which is 60 inch-lbs in this case. I suppose that was to be held consistent when rifle dissembled/re-assembled.



As for weight and accuracy, I suspect in rapid-fire sessions, the added weight of the double lugged rifle likely keeps recoil more manageable for follow-up shots, but this is somewhat of a personal preference. Anyhow, I do hope to get my project back from Accuracy Speaks in the not too distant future, and I'll update this thread once I receive the completed rifle

Builder name appears to be "Fisher"......Gus Fisher?
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